Autumn 2020 Course Offerings

Body


The most up-to-date list of course offerings is always available via View Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

Advanced
Text

French 1801 - Masterpieces of the French-Speaking World

Instructor TBA, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English. 

Classic works of literature in translation by French and francophone authors from the 17th century to the present, such as Moliere, Madame de Lafayette, Voltaire, Flaubert, Duras, Cesaire, and Senghor.


French 1802 - Cultures of the French Speaking World: Comics and French/Francophone Cultures

French 1802

7-Week Session 2: Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 2:20-5:05 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Cultures and Ideas. Taught in English.

In this class we will study comic books and graphic novels of the Franco-Belgian tradition (“bande dessinée”), particularly as they engage in questions of the representation of cultures and identities. As a form of pop culture production, with both a specialized and eclectic readership, comics are a privileged location for addressing socio-cultural issues that often have a harder time breaking in to more highly regimented cultural spheres. Nonetheless, comics in the French-speaking world have attained a cultural legitimacy that makes them highly influential as an art form. This class is taught IN ENGLISH and we will read comics in English translation from a variety of French-speaking countries that deal with social issues such as race, immigration/migration, climate change, war, sexuality, disability, national identities, etc.


French 2801 - Classics of French Cinema

French 2801 Classics of French Cinema

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 9:35 - 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

GE Visual and Performing Arts. Taught in English.

This course functions as an introduction to the study of French cinema with a focus on the “Classic” period, the 1930s-1960s, that is, from early sound cinema through the French New Wave. Readings furnish film historical context and give examples of various scholarly approaches to the study of cinema. Students will be introduced to the critical vocabulary of formal and technical analysis, and will develop skills in argumentation based on such analysis through class discussion and writing assignments. A background in film studies or French cultural studies (literature, art history, language) is of course helpful, but NOT presumed—we will do exercises in basic shot-by-shot identification and formal analysis in the beginning weeks of the semester, cultural historical context will be introduced in lecture or readings as it is relevant to interpretation, and readings will be discussed both for their content and their methodological approaches to film. Language of instruction and readings is English, and all films are available in subtitled copies. 


Italian 2051 - Italian Journeys

Italian 2051

Professor Jonathan Combs-Shilling, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Literature; and Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

This course examines cultural mobility in the Italian Renaissance through its many travelers: students and refugees, merchants and pilgrims, mercenaries and poets. We will follow Italian journeys—both historical and fictional—to the far reaches of Asia (Marco Polo), around the oceans of the world (Magellan), into the depths of Inferno (Dante) and up to the surface of the Moon (Ariosto). Through them we investigate how Italian identities were shaped by travel and the tales that travel inspires; and gain a new perspective on the place and power of travel in today’s mobile, multicultural world.


Italian 2053 - Love on the Italian Screen

Italian 2053

Professor Jonathan Mullins, MW 12:40 - 1:35 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

Why has love had such a long run on Italian cinema screens?

This course explores this question through representations of eros, romance and friendship in fiction film. We will study depictions of love in cinema from the 1910s to the present, and also analyze how what we call love intersects with questions of gender, sexuality, class and race.

Never study cinema before? No worries. A crucial component of the course will be dedicated to studying the aesthetics of narrative cinema, and also understanding it as a complex industrial product with its own systems of production and reception.


Italian 2055 - Mafia Movies

Italian 2055 Mafia Movies

Professor Dana Renga, ONLINE, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

*This class is fully online, with required synchronous meetings taking place via Zoom during the regular scheduled class times.

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization pervades almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Ciro di Marzio, Peppino Impastato, Roberto Saviano, Christopher Moltisanti, and Donnie Brasco are some of the figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits, and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema and television treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender, and representations of violence and alluring criminals.


FRIT 3052 - Mediterranean Voyages: Migration and Travel

Italian 3052

Professor Harry Kashdan, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Culture and Ideas, and Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

Tourism and migration, the two most visible kinds of human movement in the contemporary Mediterranean, are seemingly at odds. Cruise ships present a troubling contrast with the vessels employed by migrants, to say nothing of the differing accommodations enjoyed by tourists and refugees. These dissimilar manifestations of movement through the Mediterranean space are united, however, by a shared understanding of the sea itself. Migrants and tourists both conceive of the Mediterranean as a space to be moved through, rather than an endpoint. Their travels reinforce the contemporary division between the sea’s European shore and its other coasts by making a transit zone of the Mediterranean, a space of desire, a watery barrier that presents the possibility of its traverse. In the first half of the course, we will survey the historical varieties of travel in the Mediterranean. In the second half, we will examine contemporary written and filmed narratives of migration in the Mediterranean zone.

Text

Please refer to the Schedule of Classes via BuckeyeLink to view days and times of these offerrings.

Note about French 1101-1103 classes: The Department of French and Italian offers three types of courses for the French basic language sequence to meet the needs of different types of students. Please read the comparison grid carefully to determine which type of course is best suited for you. 

French 3101 French Grammar Review

 

French 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103.01 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Distance Learning (2-4 credit hours)

French 1155.01 - Beginning French Review Classroom (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.03, 1102.03, 1103.03 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Blended (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.71, 1102.71, 1103.71 - Beginning Italian II and III Online (4 credit hours)

Text

French 2101.01 - Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Section 15646: Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, TR 2:20 - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 25916: Instructor TBA, WF 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Get to know French culture, geography and history by reading texts and images critically. Learn techniques for reading and interpreting different kinds of French texts: prose, poetry, plays. Build your vocabulary, your comprehension, your conversation skills and your writing skills as you learn techniques for navigating longer readings. French 2101 is a course designed to help students transition from beginning and intermediate language courses to the more advanced reading required at the 4000-level. It should help students develop reading, writing, and analytical skills to enable them to function at the higher level, as well as develop cultural recognition to help them understand their reading in context.Conducted in French.


French 3101 - French Grammar Review

Section 15647: Instructor TBA, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 15648: Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, MWF 9:10 - 10:05 am, 3 credit hours

In this course you will find all the information that you need to speak and write like the French. Review grammar you've seen, learn some you haven't, and practice translations in order to rid your French of those pesky anglicismes! We will look at usage examples in French popular songs, film clips, and short readings, and do plenty of conversation.


French 3102 - French Pronunciation and Performance

Instructor TBA, WF 3:55 - 5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Formation of French sounds, rules of pronunciation and diction.  Reading and performing poems, excerpts from plays, public performances, television or film scripts. 


French 3103 - French Conversation

French 3103 French Conversation
Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, 7 week session 2: WF 2:20 - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours
 

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Watch Monsieur Nobek Teaches Français From Saturday Night Live

L'accent - Fabulous Trobador

“Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Si tu peux le parler allez tombez la chemise” (Art vs. Science)

Several decades ago, a colleague asked me why I was teaching slang in my conversation course considering that the students had not mastered French. I replied: “What’s ‘French’?”.

What’s “French” anyway? What does it mean to “master” a language? When someone tells you, “Mais vous n’avez aucun accent,” what are they actually saying? Is slang French? Is Marseillais French? What about French spoken in Quebec and Africa? These are only a few of the questions we shall address in this course.

As we listen to and practice French in a variety of contexts, we shall reflect on what it means for us–as individuals–to speak “French”.  I hope that each one of you will find your own idiolect amidst the endless possibilities that this local, national and world language affords us: an idiolect in which you affirm your unique identity and fluency.

You are expected to attend and actively participate in every single class. No perks for wallflowers! Please practice projecting your voice before the onset of the course so that everyone can hear you from the moment you arrive!

Quelques voix pour vous inspirer!

Recent OSU distinguished invited speaker Ta-Nehisi Coates (Middlebury French language program) (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Bradley Cooper (Studied in Aix-en-Provence for six months)

Angela Davis (French major at Brandeis University, junior year abroad in Paris)

Jodie Foster (attended the Lycée Français in LA)

Shan Sa (French writer)

Jack Kerouac (French-American writer of the Beat Generation)

Kim Thuy (Quebec writer)

David Sedaris (from Me Talk Pretty One Day)


French 3201 - French Literary and Visual Texts: Society and Struggle

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course, taught in French, we will study the ways in which literature has both shaped and been shaped by the social, political, moral, and aesthetic preoccupations of the French people through several centuries. We will read and view poetry, prose, theater, and film by authors such as Marie de France, La Fontaine, Molière, Voltaire, Balzac, Ernaux, and Hanke that reflects on what it means to live and struggle as social animals. This discussion class will further develop your critical thinking skills as well as your reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Evaluation will be based on discussion preparation and participation, an oral presentation, two essays, and three examinations.


French 3401 - Introduction to Contemporary France

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Introduction to ways of studying major aspects of French culture by means of lectures, readings, research projects, media, and internet.


French 3501 - Introduction to French for the Professions

Instructor Kelly Campbell, WF 9:35 - 10:55 am, 3 credit hours
 
An introduction to business French with emphasis on basic business terminology, commercial correspondence, similarities and differences in business transactions, and international procedures.

French 4100 - Advanced Grammar: Grammar Through Current Events

Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, WF 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Why study advanced French grammar if you are interested in international affairs? Human rights? Food?  Finance?  Migrants?  Medicine? To follow these issues in the francophone media, you need to master the written language by becoming a more educated, informed reader, as well as a more skilled, articulate writer of French. 

This course replaces FR 5101 and is required for the French major for those have not yet taken 5101. Students who have already taken 5101 cannot register for this course.


French 4401 - Creative Writing in French

Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, TR 3:55 - 5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course, students will work on their French skills through the creation of original texts. Course participants will explore the creative process through writing, expand and refine vocabulary and style, become familiar with the conventions of craft (specific to literary genres), learn about varied techniques of fiction and non-fiction, learn how to critique (and be critiqued) constructively, and reinforce revising skills, not only of language but also of ideas. 


French 5201 - Gothic to Renaissance: Texts and Contexts: The Smart Ladies, Strategic Troubadours, and Persuasive Scholars of Medieval France

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

A survey of medieval French literature from its first appearances to the Renaissance. Using the “best-selling” Romance of the Rose as a guide (it’s an allegory where a nice guy falls in love with a rose and gets quite an education out of it!), we will explore troubadour songs of love and war; the magic of King Arthur’s court; lives, lais and nouvelles by and about women authors, and more. The Middle Ages were an exciting time of growth and prosperity in France. We will read through the contexts of Gothic cathedrals, the birth of the Paris university, knights and ladies (the ladies were usually the smarter ones!), and the history of the French language.

Taught in French. Texts in parallel Old--Modern French translations. Previous knowledge of Old French not required. Accommodations made for students from other departments.


History 3263 - France at War in the 20th Century

Professor Alice Conklin, WF 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

People the world over were shocked in 2015 when terrorists affiliated with ISIS gunned down French cartoonists in their offices and scores of Parisians in cafés and a concert hall. Most of the young perpetrators were French citizens with roots in France’s former colonies. How can we make sense of these horrific events and the global outpouring they caused? This course answers this question by exploring France’s experience of four international wars and their legacies in the 20th century for ordinary men and women: the Great War (1914-1918), fought mostly on French soil and which Germany lost; the Second World War (1939-1945), in which Hitler’s rapid victory led to the birth of the French Resistance; and two “dirty wars” in Vietnam (1946-1954) and Algeria (1954-1962), in which France fought to prevent these French colonies from becoming free nations like itself.

*French majors may count this course toward their major program (one course taught in English is allowed).

*French minors may apply to Dr. Andy Spencer (spencer.4) to count it toward their minor if they have at least a 3.3 GPA in their French courses. It will not replace an upper-level (4000- or 5000-level) course taught in French for either the minor or the major.

*This course will also count toward the new French and Francophone Studies major. 

Text

French 5201 - Gothic to Renaissance: Texts and Contexts: The Smart Ladies, Strategic Troubadours, and Persuasive Scholars of Medieval France

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

A survey of medieval French literature from its first appearances to the Renaissance. Using the “best-selling” Romance of the Rose as a guide (it’s an allegory where a nice guy falls in love with a rose and gets quite an education out of it!), we will explore troubadour songs of love and war; the magic of King Arthur’s court; lives, lais and nouvelles by and about women authors, and more. The Middle Ages were an exciting time of growth and prosperity in France. We will read through the contexts of Gothic cathedrals, the birth of the Paris university, knights and ladies (the ladies were usually the smarter ones!), and the history of the French language.

Taught in French. Texts in parallel Old--Modern French translations. Previous knowledge of Old French not required. Accommodations made for students from other departments.


French 8602 - A Fluid Renaissance: Literatures and Ideologies of the Sea

FRIT 8602

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, W 2:20 - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

This seminar explores French and Italian representations of the sea from Chrétien de Troyes and Dante to Ariosto and Rabelais to at once construct and question literary histories. In the first instance, charting the pervasive currency of maritime figures, motifs and discourses across this period will familiarize students with wide swaths of the French and Italian “canon” and give them a robust sense of the major trends, themes and issues in “Medieval” and “Renaissance” culture. Yet, by supplementing our literary-historical toolkit with an array of methodologies (e.g. ecocriticism, Mediterranean Studies, “Blue Cultural Studies”), we will attend as much to the sea’s illegibility, its collapsing of binaries, and the threat it poses to modern epistemologies as we do its long-lasting, high-culture pedigree. In short, we trace the perennial usefulness of the sea for the articulation of authority (literary, historical, political) while exploring how we can use it to “unhook a particular language and its explanations from the chains of authority, allowing it to drift toward another shore” (Iann Chambers).

All discussions will be in English. All texts will be made available in both the original language and English translation, with students expected to read the former when they are able. The structure of the final project is flexible—from research papers to creative essays—and will be established through discussions with the professor based on the student’s primary field.

Text

Italian 2102 - Contemporary Italian Studies

Italian 2102 Contemporary Italian Studies

Professor Janice Aski, TR 9:35 - 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

In this course you will learn about a variety of aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture, while at the same time focusing on the four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Since you are transitioning from the elementary to the intermediate level, at this point more emphasis will be placed on developing your reading skills, so you will be exposed to a lot of authentic Italian in different genres. (However, your listening, writing, and speaking skills will not be ignored!) You will learn techniques to improve your reading in Italian and you will progress from reading relatively short texts to reading a short novel. Grammar will be reviewed and tested throughout the course. The targeted structures are: irregular plurals of nouns and adjectives, the forms and functions of the regular and some irregular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns; the passato prossimo, the imperfect, and the past perfect (trapassato prossimo), and the remote past.


Italian 2194 - The Black Mediterranean

Professor Harry Kashdan, 7 week session 2, TR 2:20 - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours.

This course can count as a course taught in English towards the Italian, French and Francophone, and Italian Studies majors.

Pending GE approval for GE Culture and Ideas, and GE Diversity: Global Studies.

The history of the Mediterranean has often been written as one of contact and conflict between the North and West (Europe and Christianity) and the South and East (North Africa, Western Asia, and Islam). Although scholars are increasingly attentive to the place of sub-Saharan African migrants and refugees in the contemporary Mediterranean, the growth of such studies risks suggesting that Blackness is somehow “new” to the Mediterranean space. A careful examination of Mediterranean history and culture shows, instead, that Black peoples have been integral to Mediterranean societies from the beginning. This course offers a broad survey of the Black Mediterranean, from the Ancient World through the present. We will explore Blackness in Classical civilizations, the construction of race in Europe’s Middle Ages, the enslavement of Black peoples in Muslim lands of the Middle East and North Africa, and the legacies of colonialism in France and Italy today. Our course materials will include literary texts, films, and academic treatments of the Black Mediterranean.


Italian 3332 - The Sounds of Italian

Instructor April Weintritt, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

During the first half of the course you will examine the relationship between the written and spoken language through engaging activities. You will also learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), which will help you focus on pronunciation and the correct articulation of sounds. Once you have mastered the word-level, the second half of the course will focus on the phrase and discourse level. Recitation of texts is an important activity for improving pronunciation. You will begin by memorizing short statements, and then memorize increasing longer texts, such as proverbs and jokes. This is followed by the recitations of poems and longer segments of narrative texts.

Goals: By the end of this course, you will have an understanding of the Italian sound system, be able to write and pronounce correct sound-to-grapheme correspondences, and have improved your pronunciation of Italian.

Language: This course will be conducted entirely in Italian.


Italian 4224 - Survey of Italian Literature

Instructor TBA, WF 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Overview of selected works of Italian literature from the origins to today. Special focus on the cultural and historical contexts of the text studied. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

Text

Italian 8602 - A Fluid Renaissance: Literatures and Ideologies of the Sea

FRIT 8602

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, W 2:20 - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

This seminar explores French and Italian representations of the sea from Chrétien de Troyes and Dante to Ariosto and Rabelais to at once construct and question literary histories. In the first instance, charting the pervasive currency of maritime figures, motifs and discourses across this period will familiarize students with wide swaths of the French and Italian “canon” and give them a robust sense of the major trends, themes and issues in “Medieval” and “Renaissance” culture. Yet, by supplementing our literary-historical toolkit with an array of methodologies (e.g. ecocriticism, Mediterranean Studies, “Blue Cultural Studies”), we will attend as much to the sea’s illegibility, its collapsing of binaries, and the threat it poses to modern epistemologies as we do its long-lasting, high-culture pedigree. In short, we trace the perennial usefulness of the sea for the articulation of authority (literary, historical, political) while exploring how we can use it to “unhook a particular language and its explanations from the chains of authority, allowing it to drift toward another shore” (Iann Chambers).

All discussions will be in English. All texts will be made available in both the original language and English translation, with students expected to read the former when they are able. The structure of the final project is flexible—from research papers to creative essays—and will be established through discussions with the professor based on the student’s primary field.