Autumn 2022 Course Offerings

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The most up-to-date list of course offerings is always available via View Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

Advanced
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Note on New GE Program

The university will roll out a new General Education program for new students beginning in Autumn 2022. These GE requirements will be called "General Education - New" or GEN.

Requirements for current students will not change, and they will continue to complete the same GE program — now called the "General Education – Legacy" or GEL.


FRIT (French and Italian) 3061 - Mediterranean Food Culture

FRIT 2061

Doctor Mark Anthony Arceno, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm, IN PERSON

  • GEL Cultures and Ideas
  • GEL Diversity: Global Studies
  • GEN Theme: Lived Environments.
  • Taught in English.

What do bacalhau, falafel, moussaka, paella, ratatouille, risotto, spanakopita, tabbaouleh, and tagines have in common (other than perhaps making your mouth water)? They are among a host of diverse dishes that represent the rich, complex, and migratory tapestry of “Mediterranean food.” Considering food as more than just a biological necessity, this course approaches food as a way of talking about culture and identity in an ever-changing world full of human and environmental interactions. How does the food we and others eat help define the spaces we inhabit and call home? What do changing landscapes mean for the availability of ingredients we might otherwise take for granted? In what ways are these relationships represented in film, literature, music, and social media? With specific regard to local, regional, and national traditions of countries that surround the Mediterranean Sea, we will spend our semester together learning about the “taste of place” and why it is so difficult to define.

This course can count as a course taught in English towards FRIT minors and majors. Please consult specific degree requirements for more information.


French 2802 - Comics and Culture

French 1802

7-Week Session 2: Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 9:35 - 10:55 am, IN PERSON

  • GEL Cultures and Ideas
  • GEN Foundation: Historical and Cultural Studies
  • Taught in English

In this class we will study comic books and graphic novels of the Franco-Belgian tradition (“bande dessinée”), particularly as they engage in questions of the representation of cultures and identities. As a form of pop culture production, with both a specialized and eclectic readership, comics are a privileged location for addressing socio-cultural issues that often have a harder time breaking in to more highly regimented cultural spheres. Nonetheless, comics in the French-speaking world have attained a cultural legitimacy that makes them highly influential as an art form. This class is taught IN ENGLISH and we will read comics in English translation from a variety of French-speaking countries that deal with social issues such as race, immigration/migration, climate change, war, sexuality, disability, national identities, etc.

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the French or French and Francophone Studies majors, as well as toward the French minor with permission.


French 2803.01 - Paris

French 2803.01

Professor Jennifer Willging, T 4:10 - 5:10 pm, ONLINE

  • GEL Cultures and Ideas
  • GEN Theme: Lived Environments
  • Taught in English

What was the city of Paris like in 1789, and how has its geography and society evolved over the last two-plus centuries? By reading and viewing representations of Paris in a variety of media (maps, photographs, films, paintings, and literary and historical texts), we will explore both how the city’s landscape has shaped its society and how its increasingly diverse society has in turn shaped and transformed its landscape to suit Parisians’ evolving needs, desires, and caprices. Each two-week unit will treat representations of a specific event or era in Parisian history that had a significant impact on the city’s organization, architecture, culture, and/or demography, and together the units will provide an understanding of how the city and its people have been represented for various purposes.

This course can be counted toward the French or French and Francophone Studies major, we well as toward the French minor with permission.


Italian 2051 – Italian Journeys

Italian 2051

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, MW 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, IN PERSON

  • GEL Literature
  • GEL Diversity: Global Studies
  • Taught in English

This course examines cultural mobility in the Italian Renaissance through its many travelers: students and refugees, merchants and pilgrims, mercenaries and poets. We will follow Italian journeys—both historical and fictional—to the far reaches of Asia (Marco Polo), around the oceans of the world (Magellan), into the depths of Inferno (Dante) and up to the surface of the Moon (Ariosto). Through them we investigate how Italian identities were shaped by travel and the tales that travel inspires; and gain a new perspective on the place and power of travel in today’s mobile, multicultural world.

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.


Italian 2055 - Mafia Movies

Italian 2055 Mafia Movies

Doctor Giuliano Migliori, WF 12:45 - 1:40 pm, ONLINE

*Distance synchronous WF 12:45 - 1:40 pm with asynchronous components.

  • GEL Visual and Performing Arts
  • GEN Foundation: Literary, Visual & Performing Arts
  • Taught in English

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization pervades almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Ciro di Marzio, Peppino Impastato, Roberto Saviano, Christopher Moltisanti, and Donnie Brasco are some of the figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits, and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema and television treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender, and representations of violence and alluring criminals.

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.


Italian 2056 - Love on the Italian Screen

Italian 2056

Professor Jonathan Mullins, MW 2:20 - 3:40 pm, IN PERSON

  • GEL Visual and Performing Arts
  • GEL Diversity: Global Studies
  • GEN Foundation: Literary, Visual & Performing Arts
  • Taught in English

Why has love had such a long run in Italian cinema and television? 

This course explores this question through representations of eros, romance and friendship in Italian screen cultures. We will study depictions of love in cinema from the 1910s to the present, and also analyze how what we call love intersects with questions of gender, sexuality, class and race. 

Never study TV or cinema before? No worries. A crucial component of the course will be dedicated to studying the aesthetics of narrative cinema, and also understanding it as a complex industrial product with its own systems of production and reception. 

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.

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The most up-to-date list of course offerings is always available via View Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.


French 3101 French Grammar Review

French 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103.01 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1101.21, 1102.21, 1103.21 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom Synchronous Distance Learning (4 credit hours)

French 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Instruction Distance Learning (2-4 credit hours)

French 1155.01 - Beginning French Review Classroom (4 credit hours)


Italian 1101.03, 1102.03, 1103.03 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Classroom Blended (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.71, 1102.71, 1103.71 - Beginning Italian II and III Online (4 credit hours)

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French 2101.01 - Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

French 2101

Section TBA: Instructor TBA, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm

Section TBA: Instructor TBA, TR 2:20 - 3:40 pm

Get to know French culture, geography and history by reading texts and images critically. Learn techniques for reading and interpreting different kinds of French texts: prose, poetry, plays. Build your vocabulary, your comprehension, your conversation skills and your writing skills as you learn techniques for navigating longer readings. French 2101 is a course designed to help students transition from beginning and intermediate language courses to the more advanced reading required at the 4000-level. It should help students develop reading, writing, and analytical skills to enable them to function at the higher level, as well as develop cultural recognition to help them understand their reading in context. Conducted in French.


French 2101.01H - Honors Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Marc Chagall, "Paris Through the Window"
Marc Chagall, "Paris Through the Window"

Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, TR 2:20 - 3:40 pm

Get to know French culture, geography and history by reading texts and images critically. Learn techniques for reading and interpreting different kinds of French texts: prose, poetry, plays. Build your vocabulary, your comprehension, your conversation skills and your writing skills as you learn techniques for navigating longer readings. French 2101 is a course designed to help students transition from beginning and intermediate language courses to the more advanced reading required at the 4000-level. It should help students develop reading, writing, and analytical skills to enable them to function at the higher level, as well as develop cultural recognition to help them understand their reading in context. Conducted in French. Prereq: French 1103 or 1104.


French 3101 - French Grammar Review

French 3101

Section TBA: Instructor TBA, TR 11:10 am - 12:30 pm

Section TBA: Doctor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, MWF 9:10 - 10:05 am, 3 credit hours

In this course you will find all the information that you need to speak and write like the French. Review grammar you've seen, learn some you haven't, and practice translations in order to rid your French of those pesky anglicismes! We will look at usage examples in French popular songs, film clips, and short readings, and do plenty of conversation.


French 3103 - French Conversation

French 3103 French Conversation
Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, 7 week session 2: WF 2:20 - 5:00 pm
 

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Watch Monsieur Nobek Teach Français From Saturday Night Live

L'accent - Fabulous Trobadors

“Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Si tu peux le parler allez tombez la chemise” (Art vs. Science)

Several decades ago, a colleague asked me why I was teaching slang in my conversation course considering that the students had not mastered French. I replied: “What’s ‘French’?”.

What’s “French” anyway? What does it mean to “master” a language? When someone tells you, “Mais vous n’avez aucun accent,” what are they actually saying? Is slang French? Is Marseillais French? What about French spoken in Quebec and Africa? These are only a few of the questions we shall address in this course.

As we listen to and practice French in a variety of contexts, we shall reflect on what it means for us–as individuals–to speak “French”.  I hope that each one of you will find your own idiolect amidst the endless possibilities that this local, national and world language affords us: an idiolect in which you affirm your unique identity and fluency.

You are expected to attend and actively participate in every single class session. No perks for wallflowers!

A few voices to inspire you:

Recent OSU distinguished invited speaker Ta-Nehisi Coates (Middlebury French language program) (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Bradley Cooper (Studied in Aix-en-Provence for six months)

Angela Davis (French major at Brandeis University, junior year abroad in Paris)

Jodie Foster (attended the Lycée Français in LA)

Shan Sa (French writer)

Jack Kerouac (French-American writer of the Beat Generation)

Kim Thúy (Quebec writer)

David Sedaris (from Me Talk Pretty One Day)


French 3401 - Introduction to Contemporary France

French 3401

Doctor Beth Bishop, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm

Someone told me that most French people are socialists. Is that true?

Is the hijab banned in France or not?

It seems like so many young adults in France live with their parents. Why?

If you’d like to explore the answers to questions like these, French 3401 may be the course for you. After completing this course, you should have a much-improved understanding of contemporary French society. We will examine French culture through a general survey of political, social, educational, and cultural structures. We will examine cultural differences, including those within France’s border, so that you may engage more fully with French and international current events and enrich your understanding of French society. Taught in French.


French 3403 - La Cuisine Française: Gastronomic Culture, Language, and Expression

French 3403

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm

Explore Global French cultural ideas around dining, good table manners, and the meanings of food through short readings and media. Taste fabulous specialties (to the extent possible during the lingering pandemic!) and learn to cook to some simple and classic dishes from the many regions where the French language and the food culture go together. We will spice things up with a pinch of grammar (sorry, cheesy metaphor!) and plenty of conversation. Learn to read and translate recipes. Discuss and write about your personal experiences with food and with experiencing other cultures. This will be a practical and delicious language course.

"Dis-moi ce que tu manges : je te dirai ce que tu es." - Brillat-Savarin

Required materials 

  1. À Table! The Food Culture of France, Becky A. Brown. 2nd Hackett. ISBN 978-1-58510-847-3. Available from B&N OSU Bookstore: https://tinyurl.com/W21-FRENCH-3403-29179 (Links to an external site.)
  2. Some films streaming on Amazon/ Google Play etc., around $2.99
  3. Some food expenditures
  4. Marguerite Abouet, Aya de Yopougon, ISBN 978-2070573110. (Available on Amazon and elsewhere; optional)

French 3501 - Introduction to French for the Professions - “Getting Down to Business in the Francophone World”

French 3501
Doctor Kelly Campbell, WF 9:35 - 10:55 am
 

In a global world where an increasing number of students are seeking international jobs, understanding foreign professional practices has become a critical skill. We will draft resumés and cover letters, conduct mock interviews, and cover a wide range of business and professional concepts to help students develop skills for a future position where French may be used.  Topics such as entrepreneurship, sustainable development, and global engagement will be discussed to prepare for a career where cultural knowledge of the professional francophone world is essential. Non-business majors welcome! Taught in French. (Prereq: 3101 or 3102; permission of instructor.)


French 4100 - Advanced Grammar: Grammar Through Current Events

Doctor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, WF 12:45 - 2:05 pm

Why study advanced French grammar if you are interested in international affairs? Human rights? Food?  Finance?  Migrants?  Medicine? To follow these issues in the francophone media, you need to master the written language by becoming a more educated, informed reader, as well as a more skilled, articulate writer of French. 

This course replaces FR 5101 and is required for the French major for those have not yet taken 5101. Students who have already taken 5101 cannot register for this course.


French 4401 - Topics in French and Francophone Studies: America in French Eyes

Image From Tintin
Image From Tintin

Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, TR 3:55 – 5:15 pm

Through the study of works signed by travelers, philosophers, novelists, comic book writers, and intellectuals, we will explore the various ways in which the French have interpreted American society from the 18th century to the present day. Our historical perspective will allow us to analyze the evolution of French discourse on the United States and to highlight how representations of America in French literature and thought reflect the concerns and fears of the French themselves. This course will examine a variety of themes, including the fascination with America, the emergence of anti-Americanism, the condition of Native Americans, critiques of capitalism and philistinism, and the ambivalence of the relationship to progress.


French 5203 - Scandal, Sex, and Social Climbing in 19th-Century French Literature

Cover of Madame Bovary

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm

In this course we will immerse ourselves in works by some of the most iconic French authors of the realist tradition, a literary style most fully developed over the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These short stories and novels are bursting with colorful characters struggling with everyday human challenges just as pertinent today as they were when these texts were first published, challenges such as social mobility, social justice, modernization, consumerism, love, and sex, among others. Along with focusing on such themes, we will also examine the literary techniques these writers used to convince readers then and now that what they have on the pages before them are faithful and “objective” representations of reality. Taught in French.

Sample reading list

Honoré de Balzac, Sarrasine (1830) and Old Goriot (1835)

Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (1856)

Emile Zola, various short stories (1865-74) and “J’accuse!” (1898)

Guy de Maupassant, Contes du jour et de la nuit (1885)

Colette, Gigi (1944)

Barthes, Roland, “L’effet de reel” (1968)


Film Studies 4650 - Contemporary European TV: Climates of Change

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm

The European Union as political and monetary reality came into being in the same era as the emergence of “quality television,” characterized by higher production values, longer-arc narratives, and shifts in important players in studio production, streaming, and vertical re-integration, as well as the evolution of possibilities for regional and transnational funding have created spaces for engaging with anxieties around social and environmental change. Pending availability, series studied may include: The Bridge, Black Spot, Gomorrah, Tribes of Europa, A French Village, Cable Girls, Occupied.

This course may count as a course taught in English towards the FRIT majors.

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French 5203 - Scandal, Sex, and Social Climbing in 19th-Century French Literature

Cover of Madame Bovary

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm

In this course we will immerse ourselves in works by some of the most iconic French authors of the realist tradition, a literary style most fully developed over the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These short stories and novels are bursting with colorful characters struggling with everyday human challenges just as pertinent today as they were when these texts were first published, challenges such as social mobility, social justice, modernization, consumerism, love, and sex, among others. Along with focusing on such themes, we will also examine the literary techniques these writers used to convince readers then and now that what they have on the pages before them are faithful and “objective” representations of reality. Taught in French.

Sample reading list

Honoré de Balzac, Sarrasine (1830) and Old Goriot (1835)

Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (1856)

Emile Zola, various short stories (1865-74) and “J’accuse!” (1898)

Guy de Maupassant, Contes du jour et de la nuit (1885)

Colette, Gigi (1944)

Barthes, Roland, “L’effet de reel” (1968)


French 6571 - French Reading for Pleasure and More! 

French 6571

Professor Wynne Wong, ONLINE Asynchronous

Do you wish you could read literary works in French or news on the internet from different parts of the French-speaking world? What about song lyrics or a recipe in French? Perhaps you need to read academic articles in French for your graduate degree. Or maybe you are a heritage speaker who wants to learn French grammar and read texts in your heritage language.

This online asynchronous course will provide you with the foundational tools to read a variety of texts in French from different parts of the French-speaking world. Intensive reading in French is also an excellent way to begin your acquisition of the French language.

Taught mostly in English, this course is designed primarily for students who have no previous formal preparation in French. The course covers basic grammar and vocabulary with the goal of developing students' reading skills in French. FR 6571 is tailored to individual students’ professional and personal reasons for reading French.

This course is taught asynchronously with optional synchronous discussion sessions.

Who can take this course?

There is no prerequisite for this course. This course is open to graduate students as well as to non-degree students in continuing education programs. Permission may also be granted to undergraduates to take the course on a case-by-case basis. Heritage speakers of French are welcome.

For degree-seeking graduate students, please note that credit does not apply to the minimum number of hours required for the master's or doctoral degrees. This course does not fulfill the GE requirement for world languages for undergraduates.

Note: This is a course for which students students tend to register later; please register as soon as you know you will take this course to avoid it being cancelled due to low enrollment. Thank you.


FRIT (French and Italian) 8602 - Comparative French and Italian Studies: Topic TBA

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, W 2:20 - 5:00 pm

Focuses on a comparative aspect of French and Italian studies.


Film Studies 4650 - Contemporary European TV: Climates of Change

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm

The European Union as political and monetary reality came into being in the same era as the emergence of “quality television,” characterized by higher production values, longer-arc narratives, and shifts in important players in studio production, streaming, and vertical re-integration, as well as the evolution of possibilities for regional and transnational funding have created spaces for engaging with anxieties around social and environmental change. Pending availability, series studied may include: The Bridge, Black Spot, Gomorrah, Tribes of Europa, A French Village, Cable Girls, Occupied.

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Italian 2102 - Contemporary Italian Studies

Italian 2102 Contemporary Italian Studies

Doctor April Weintritt, MW 9:35 - 10:55 am

In this course you will learn about a variety of aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture, while at the same time focusing on the four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Since you are transitioning from the elementary to the intermediate level, at this point more emphasis will be placed on developing your reading skills, so you will be exposed to a lot of authentic Italian in different genres. (However, your listening, writing, and speaking skills will not be ignored!) You will learn techniques to improve your reading in Italian and you will progress from reading relatively short texts to reading a short novel. Grammar will be reviewed and tested throughout the course. The targeted structures are: irregular plurals of nouns and adjectives, the forms and functions of the regular and some irregular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns; the passato prossimo, the imperfect, and the past perfect (trapassato prossimo), and the remote past.


Italian 3103 – Styles and Stylistics

Professor Janice Aski, TR 11:10 am – 12:30 pm

If you want to learn how to write….you have to write….a lot….

This is a writing intensive course in which students develop the skills necessary for writing efficiently and effectively in Italian in a variety of styles and genres. You will also learn how to use translators correctly and effectively, while also exploring the impact of translator technology on human communication. The targeted structures for this course are: le preposizioni e le preposizioni articolate; i pronomi tonici e atoni; i pronomi relativi; il passato prossimo, il trapassato prossimo e l’imperfetto; il congiuntivo (tutti i tempi); la concordanza dei tempi; le congiunzioni.


Italian 4223 - Italian Cinema

Professor Jonathan Mullins, MW 11:10 am – 12:30 pm

Examination of Italian cinema from Neorealism to the present. Discussion of contemporary society and culture with a brief introduction to film theory. Not open students who are native speakers of Italian. 


Film Studies 4650 - Contemporary European TV: Climates of Change

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm

The European Union as political and monetary reality came into being in the same era as the emergence of “quality television,” characterized by higher production values, longer-arc narratives, and shifts in important players in studio production, streaming, and vertical re-integration, as well as the evolution of possibilities for regional and transnational funding have created spaces for engaging with anxieties around social and environmental change. Pending availability, series studied may include: The Bridge, Black Spot, Gomorrah, Tribes of Europa, A French Village, Cable Girls, Occupied.

This course may count as a course taught in English towards the FRIT majors.

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FRIT (French and Italian) 8602 - Comparative French and Italian Studies: Topic TBA

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, W 2:20 - 5:00 pm

Focuses on a comparative aspect of French and Italian studies.


Film Studies 4650 - Contemporary European TV: Climates of Change

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm

The European Union as political and monetary reality came into being in the same era as the emergence of “quality television,” characterized by higher production values, longer-arc narratives, and shifts in important players in studio production, streaming, and vertical re-integration, as well as the evolution of possibilities for regional and transnational funding have created spaces for engaging with anxieties around social and environmental change. Pending availability, series studied may include: The Bridge, Black Spot, Gomorrah, Tribes of Europa, A French Village, Cable Girls, Occupied.