Spring 2019 Course Offerings

GE Courses


French 1801 - Masterpieces of the French-Speaking World, GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English. 

Discover masterpieces of French Literature:

  • Explore French history and geography through classic Asterix comics
  • Study a variety of "sound bytes" in the form of classic fables, short stories and poems on major themes such as pleasure and unmasking posers
  • Read Molière's scathing comedies mocking hypocrisy and self-righteousness
  • …and Flaubert's great novel of shopping gone wrong, Madame Bovary
  • Gain techniques for reading plays, poems, and prose faster and better
  • Become a better critic and observer of your own culture

French 1801 - Masterpieces of the French Speaking World: "Sartre, Coffee, and Cigarettes," GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies

7-Week Session 2: Professor Patrick Bray, TR 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

French existentialism was an attitude that defined an era.  For the first time in history, an obscure philosophical movement based on the ethics of personal choice led to a revolution in youth culture starting in the cafés and nightclubs of Paris and spreading throughout the world.  This course will examine not only the exciting literary and philosophical works that founded the movement, but also the cultural revolution it inspired. Works by Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Boris Vian, and films by Jean Cocteau, Jean-Luc Godard, and Agnès Varda. 

French 1802 - French and Francophone Cultures, GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies

Instructor TBA, WF 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English. Details coming soon!

Italian 2052 - Fictions of Italy: Modern and Contemporary Literature and Society, GE Literature; and Diversity: Global Studies

Professor Luca Peretti, WF 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

How did Italians imagine the rest of the world? And how did they see it in travels, explorations, migrations, and colonization? In this course we will look at the ways in which the East, the West and South of the world has been recounted in Italian culture.

Travelers, colonizers, migrants, explorers: Italians have traversed the globe for different reasons and in distinct ways. In this course we will examine Italian cultural mobility from the 18th century to the present through films, memoirs, books, chronicles, operas, letters, and travel guides. We will look at the many waves of Italian migration to North and South America, at the role of Italian explorers and adventurers in “exotic” places around the world, and even Italian colonizers in Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean from the largely forgotten but key period of colonialism and decolonization whose history we will construct. Our goal throughout will be to examine the traces of Italian culture around the world, and of world cultures within Italy. Italy is a site for tourism and exploration, and a place of arrival and departure; a place where people immigrate – especially at present with the arrivals of migrants from Africa, Middle East and Eastern Europe – and one with a strong history of emigration. This dynamic will be at the heart of this course, in order to highlight the fluidity, diversity, and composite nature of a national culture.

Italian 2055 - Mafia Movies, GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies

Professor Dana Renga, WF 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English. 

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization pervades almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Ciro di Marzio, Peppino Impastato, Roberto Saviano, Christopher Moltisanti, and Donnie Brasco are some of the figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits, and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema and television treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender, and representations of violence and alluring criminals. 

Italian 3051 - The Crossroads of Romance: Tales of Heroes and Monsters from the Odyssey to Star Wars, GE Literature, and Diversity: Global Studies

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

Knights of the Round Table, Amazon warriors, wild-west gunslingers, intergalactic Jedi—these heroic archetypes are linked by the narrative strategy and ideological structures of romance. In this course, students will learn about the medieval precedents for these wandering heroes (and heroines); and investigate the enduring influence of romance narrative on how stories are told and communities are represented. We will begin with its classical roots (Homer’s Odyssey) and contemporary works that either synthesize or, like Monty Python’s Holy Grail, satirize the genre to become familiar with its conventions. We will then read medieval and renaissance “classics” of the genre, before turning to recent stories shaped by romance, from the historical spy novel to Star Wars: Rogue One. Our focus will be the titanic impact of romance on representations of European cultural values and its frequently problematic depiction of foreign cultures (esp. the Middle East). Throughout, we will ask the question: has romance been a site for the “clash of civilizations,” a space for multicultural exchange, or both?

Italian 3052 - The Mediterranean: Mediterranean Voyages: Migration and Travel, GE Culture and Ideas: Global Studies

Professor Harry Kashdan, WF 9:35-10:55 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English

Tourism and migration, the two most visible kinds of human movement in the contemporary Mediterranean, are seemingly at odds. Cruise ships present a troubling contrast with the vessels employed by migrants, to say nothing of the differing accommodations enjoyed by tourists and refugees. These dissimilar manifestations of movement through the Mediterranean space are united, however, by a shared understanding of the sea itself. Migrants and tourists both conceive of the Mediterranean as a space to be moved through, rather than an endpoint. Their travels reinforce the contemporary division between the sea’s European shore and its other coasts by making a transit zone of the Mediterranean, a space of desire, a watery barrier that presents the possibility of its traverse. In the first half of the course, we will survey the historical varieties of travel in the Mediterranean. In the second half, we will examine contemporary written and filmed narratives of migration in the Mediterranean zone.

CLLC 2301.1S & 2301.02 - Global Citizen Summer Camp, GE Service Learning

Professor Janice Aski, T 9:00-10:50 am, 3 credit hours

This course satisfies the GE for Service Learning and can count for majors and minors in Italian, French, German and Portuguese. Enrollment is limited to two students for each language, so act quickly!

In the two credit Spring course, OSU students will learn the theories, skills and techniques involved in teaching foreign languages and cultures to middle school children. We will work together to create lesson plans for one two-hour full-immersion language class, one one-hour interactive culture presentation taught in English, and one international game that you will teach in the summer camp, which will take place June 3-7, 2019. Students are required to enroll in both courses, so do NOT enroll in the Spring course if you know you cannot teach in the camp. For more details see the full description and/or contact Prof. Aski.

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Introductory Language Courses


Please refer to the Schedule of Classes via BuckeyeLink to view days and times of these offerrings.

French

French 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103.01 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1101.51, 1102.51, 1103.51 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Instruction (1-4 credit hours)

  • French Individualized Instruction is an alternative to the classroom track. Students work at their own pace in this program and meet with an instructor on campus for speaking practice and quizzes. Students can register for 1-4 credit hours per semester.

French 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Distance Learning (4 credit hours)

  • French Individualized Distance Learning allows students to complete course material entirely online. Students work at their own pace in this program and can register for 1-4 credit hours per semester

French 1155.01 - Beginning French Review Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1155.51 - Beginning French Review Individualized Instruction (1-4 credit hours)

  • French Individualized Instruction is an alternative to the classroom track. Students work at their own pace in this program and meet with an instructor on campus for speaking practice and quizzes. Students can register for 1-4 credit hours per semester.

Italian

Italian 1101.03, 1102.03, 1103.03 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Blended (4 credit hours)

  • Students attend class three days/week and complete the equivalent of the work of one class period online.

Italian 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Individualized Instruction (4 credit hours)

  • Italian Individualized Instruction is an online alternative to the classroom track. Students work at their own pace in this program and can register for 1-4 credit hours per semester. 

Italian 1102.02, 1103.02 - Beginning Italian II and III Hybrid Instruction (4 credit hours)

  • Students attend class two days a week and complete the rest of their work on-line. This course is not for everyone. The successful student is organized, self-motivated, able to learn grammar concepts on his/her own, and is comfortable with technology.

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French Undergraduate Courses


French 2101.01 - Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Section 18752: TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 26478: Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 9:35-10:55am, 3 credit hours

This course serves as the bridge between the beginning language courses (1101-1103) and upper-level French courses.  By emphasizing all skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), it will prepare you for further work in language, literature, and culture and for a minor or major in French.  You will be introduced to a variety of texts (both literary and cultural), as well as to music and films from France and other francophone countries.  Close reading and analysis will be emphasized. Because knowledge of language impacts the ability to read and interpret a text, grammar is also a component of the course. 

French 2101.01H - Honors Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

How can the act of opening a door constitute poetry? Why do contemporary French musicians make use of seventeenth and nineteenth century writers such as La Fontaine and Rimbaud? Is hip-hop poetry? Are love and war related topics? Why is Camus still the best selling author in France? Is the French spoken in Quebec still “French”? How do gender and ethnicity alter language and culture? Join us as we answer these and other questions pertinent to French and francophone studies, on a journey that will take us from France to Quebec, Algeria, Martinique, and other countries. Representative works from literature and the media will be read in conjunction with music and film.

This course prepares students for further work in culture, literature, composition, and conversation. Students will gain proficiency in analyzing literary texts and media materials. They are expected to engage in lively class discussions and give oral presentations. Writing is also an essential component of the course. There will be an intensive peer-edited writing workshop that will prepare you for advanced writing in French. The course will also introduce students to the workings of undergraduate research.

Non-honors students are welcome, but need the permission of the instructor to enroll.

French 3101 - French Grammar Review

Section 18753: Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, MWF 12:40-1:35 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 33279: Instructor TBA, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

In this course you will find all the information that you need to speak and write like the French. Review grammar you've seen, learn some you haven't, and practice translations in order to rid your French of those pesky anglicismes! We will look at usage examples in French popular songs, film clips, and short readings, and do plenty of conversation.

French 3102 - French Pronunciation and Performance

Instructor TBA, WF 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Formation of French sounds, rules of pronunciation and diction.  Reading and performing poems, excerpts from plays, public performances, television or film scripts. 

French 3103 - French Conversation
 
Professor Garett Heysel, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours
 

Practice in speaking French on a variety of topics; building of practical vocabulary; emphasis on comprehension and oral expression.

French 3201 - French Literary and Visual Texts

Instructor TBA, TR 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Students improve reading, writing, and speaking skills by analyzing and discussing full-length French literary works and visual texts-such as paintings, fashion, photographs, and films from the Middle ages to the present.

French 3202 - Literary and Visual Texts of the Francophone World

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

This course is multi-media in nature, thereby reflecting the rich literary, cinematographic, and musical diversity of the francophone world. One of our goals will be to understand the ways in which texts, films, and music connect to give us an aesthetic, cultural, political and historical understanding and appreciation of France and other countries where French is spoken. We will not exclude France from la francophonie, but rather consider how France has become a multi-cultural society, over the past few decades. The French language itself has become trans-cultural. The materials in this course cover Québec, Algeria, Morocco, French Guiana, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Congo, and ethnic minorities in France. 

French 3301 - Discovering Second Language Acquisition

Professor Wynne Wong, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Taught in English

This course introduces undergraduate students to the exciting field of second language acquisition. This course is ideal for language learners who wish to reflect on and improve their own language learning experience, for those who desire to become language instructors, and for anyone who simply has an interest in languages. The questions we will explore include:

  • Is second language acquisition like first language acquisition?
  • Does the first language help or get in the way of SLA?
  • Why do children become universally native-like but second language learners seem not to?
  • Why do we make errors in a second language (or at least appear to)?
  • Is there a best way to teach languages?
  • I took 4 years of Spanish and got all As so why am I not fluent?
  • What’s the difference between learning two languages from birth as opposed to learning a second language later in life?
  • What about individual differences like motivation and aptitude?
  • Why do I still have an accent?
French 3401 - Introduction to Contemporary French Culture
 

Section 28395: Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course on contemporary French and Quebecois cultures, we will study cultural and intellectual responses to events such as wars, decolonization, immigration, social revolution, the formation of the European Union, and globalization. Our principal objective will be to better understand the historical, geographical, and political reasons for the many cultural differences among the French, Quebecois, and US-American peoples, differences that often confuse, and sometimes dismay, travelers from all three regions. 

Section 31594: Insturctor Beth Bishop, WF 3:55-5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

French 4100 - Advanced Grammar: Grammar Through Current Events

Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, WF 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Why study advanced French grammar if you are interested in international affairs? Human rights? Food?  Finance?  Migrants?  Medicine? To follow these issues in the francophone media, you need to master the written language by becoming a more educated, informed reader, as well as a more skilled, articulate writer of French. 

This course replaces FR 5101 and is required for the French major for those have not yet taken 5101. Students who have already taken 5101 cannot register for this course.

French 4401 - Creative Writing in French

Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, WF 3:55-5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course, students will work on their French skills through the creation of original texts. Course participants will explore the creative process through writing, expand and refine vocabulary and style resources, become familiar with the conventions of craft (specific to genre), learn about varied techniques of fiction and non-fiction, learn how to critique (and be critiqued) constructively, and reinforce revising skills, not only of language but also of ideas. Prerequiste: Fr 3101.

CLLC 2301.1S & 2301.02 - Global Citizen Summer Camp, GE Service Learning

Professor Janice Aski, T 9:00-10:50 am, 3 credit hours

This course satisfies the GE for Service Learning and can count for majors and minors in Italian, French, German and Portuguese. Enrollment is limited to two students for each language, so act quickly!

In the two credit Spring course, OSU students will learn the theories, skills and techniques involved in teaching foreign languages and cultures to middle school children. We will work together to create lesson plans for one two-hour full-immersion language class, one one-hour interactive culture presentation taught in English, and one international game that you will teach in the summer camp, which will take place June 3-7, 2019. Students are required to enroll in both courses, so do NOT enroll in the Spring course if you know you cannot teach in the camp. For more details see the full description and/or contact Prof. Aski.

MEDREN 2215 - Gothic Paris 1100-1300, GE Culture and Ideas, GE Diversity: Global Studies, Taught in English

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, Tuesday/Thursday 2:20-3:40 pm

May be counted as an outside course in English towards the French major.

Paris became a center for learning, beauty, power, and shopping in the High Middle Ages. Discover the first Gothic cathedrals, Courtly Love, King Arthur’s justice, and the love affair between the philosopher Abelard and his gifted student Heloise in the age of the birth of the university. Explore the streets of Paris and its monuments through readings, films, interactive web maps, and hands-on experiences. Assignments: midterm & final exam (multiple choice), short quizzes, and a short research project on experiencing something related to medieval Paris. 

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French 5000-level (UG/G) and Graduate Courses


French 5401 - The Sun King to World War I

Professor Benjamin Hoffmann, WF 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

The aim of the course is to cover three hundred years of French history. It will focus on the major cultural and political events that have shaped the image of France over the centuries and have given rise to one of the most dynamic and influential cultures in the world. The periods to be studied and illustrated via text and film include the Age of the Sun King, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the First and Second Empires, the Restoration, the Third Republic, and World War I. Authors to be studied will include Descartes, La Fontaine, La Bruyère, Saint-Simon, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Olympe de Gouges, Beaumarchais, Crèvecoeur, Balzac, Dumas, Hugo, Zola, Proust, Apollinaire, and Céline. Other works to be examined will include paintings by Watteau, Fragonard, Monet, and Renoir, as well as cinematic representations of the period by Guitry, Leconte, Enrico, and Tavernier. The course will be conducted in French. Prerequistes: Fr 3101 and Fr 3401.

French 5701 - Gendered Bodies in Global Francophone Cinemas

Professor Maggie Flinn, TR 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

This course focuses on films from the 1960s-present that come from many different parts of the French-speaking world (including the Hexagon). Such films emerge from various de-, post/, and neo-colonial relationships between French-speaking European nations and the rest of the French speaking world. Working comparatively, then, we will consider how film can be used to address the following types of questions: How do these bodies move through space? How are their identities shaped and represented? How does gender, as an axis of identity, interact with individuals’ relationships to the socio-cultural context in which they live? In newly independent nations, are some bodies more independent that others? Who embodies history for the nation? Is the gendering of bodies a constraining or liberating process?

The language of instruction of this course is French, and all films have French dialogue or are subtitled in French. A background in film studies is NOT required to take this class (although experience in some sort of visual analysis is of course helpful). Undergraduate pre-requisite is French 3101 plus at least one additional 3000- or 4000-level course.

Graduate students from other departments who whose research agenda is would be well suited to this material but are uncertain as to whether their French skills are adequate for discussion or reading are encouraged to consult with the professor to see what types of accommodations may be made.

French 8302 - Issues in Second Language Acquisition: Processing Instruction & Structured Input: 20+ Years Of Theory, Research And Application

Professor Wynne Wong, Thursday 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

In 1993, VanPatten and Cadierno published a seminal article that challenged the field of instructed second language acquisition. They argued that L2 instruction tended to be too heavily oriented on product and not well grounded in an understanding of underlying processes of acquisition.  Out of this research emerged processing instruction (PI), a type of pedagogical intervention driven by a theory of input processing. Today, there are over 50 studies on PI and there is evidence to support that L2 instruction can affect underlying knowledge if the intervention can change how learners process input. This seminar examines in depth this research agenda and its pedagogical implications. Taught in English.

French 8601 - Theory and Practice: From the Art of Medicine to Medicine in the Arts

Professor Lucille Toth, Monday 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

AIDS, cancer, disability, hysteria, surgery are among medical conditions and practices that inspired artists and authors throughout History. This course aims to analyze 20th and 21st-century representations of medicine and illness in literature, dance, cinema and pop culture by analyzing specific art pieces. From French performer Orlan who uses plastic surgery to become a “menstruous woman” to HIV+ choreographer Alain Buffard who performs his own illness on stage, we will develop arguments about how Western medicine and culture conceptualize bodies, pathology and health and how social categories of gender, race, class are implicit in these concepts.

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Italian Undergraduate Courses


Italian 2102 - Contemporary Italian Studies

Instructor TBA, WF 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course you will learn about a variety of aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture, while at the same time focusing on the four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Since you are transitioning from the elementary to the intermediate level, at this point more emphasis will be placed on developing your reading skills, so you will be exposed to a lot of authentic Italian in different genres. (However, your listening, writing, and speaking skills will not be ignored!) You will learn techniques to improve your reading in Italian and you will progress from reading relatively short texts to reading a short novel. Grammar will be reviewed and tested throughout the course. The targeted structures are: irregular plurals of nouns and adjectives, the forms and functions of the regular and some irregular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns; the passato prossimo, the imperfect, and the past perfect (trapassato prossimo), and the remote past.

Italian 3103 - Styles and Stylistics 

Professor Janice Aski, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

This is a writing intensive course in which students develop the skills necessary for writing efficiently and effectively in Italian in a variety of styles. Students will write slogans and an advertisement, a biography, a newspaper article, letters and emails, a film summary, an opinion piece and short stories. Grammar points will be introduced or reviewed in relation to the essays in which they are used. The targeted structures for this course are: le preposizioni e le preposizioni articolate; i pronomi tonici e atoni; i pronomi relativi; il passato prossimo, il trapassato prossimo e l’imperfetto; il congiuntivo (tutti i tempi); la concordanza dei tempi; le congiunzioni.

Italian 4224 - Italian Literature 

Instructor Giuliano Milgliori, TR 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

For centuries the Italian landscape has been exalted as an example of quintessential beauty. At the same time, nature tells multiple stories, not only of wonder but also of harm and travesty.

This course traces how Italian culture has imagined and examined the crucial relationship between humans and the environment. From the early 1300s to today’s econarratives, Italian culture has forged a special place in the investigation of “natural worlds” in alignment and/or contrast to urban communities with their social, political and economic developments. We will examine how a variety of representations of the nonhuman world (animals, landscapes, toxicity, pollution, natural disasters, natural resources) shapes our thinking, actions, and emotions as they intersect with identity, social integration, exclusion and resiliency. We will look at many layers of cultural production: narratives, poems, visual arts, media and digital materials: from medieval cosmologies to the Renaissance’s dominion of nature, to 20th-century avant garde hybrid literatures and cyborg-life and recent narrations of industries and toxic environments.

Some key questions for discovering “another Italy”: what is the role of the natural world in Italian culture and how do econarratives change throughout place and time? How do they inform the historical, political and social characteristics of Italy? How do different media and poetic forms engage in the socio-political sphere of today’s environmental questions?

CLLC 2301.1S & 2301.02 - Global Citizen Summer Camp, GE Service Learning

Professor Janice Aski, T 9:00-10:50 am, 3 credit hours

This course satisfies the GE for Service Learning and can count for majors and minors in Italian, French, German and Portuguese. Enrollment is limited to two students for each language, so act quickly!

In the two credit Spring course, OSU students will learn the theories, skills and techniques involved in teaching foreign languages and cultures to middle school children. We will work together to create lesson plans for one two-hour full-immersion language class, one one-hour interactive culture presentation taught in English, and one international game that you will teach in the summer camp, which will take place June 3-7, 2019. Students are required to enroll in both courses, so do NOT enroll in the Spring course if you know you cannot teach in the camp. For more details see the full description and/or contact Prof. Aski.

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Italian 5000-level (UG/G) and Graduate Courses


Italian 5101 - Intensive Italian, GE Foreign Language

Instructor TBA, MWF 11:10-12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

Italian 8243 - Italian Transnational Cinema

Professor Luca Peretti, Wednesday 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

Concepts of national cinema are frequently deployed to organize films. Alongside paintings, books, or plays, we group films according to their national provenence. In this course, we will question this idea at its root, suggesting that a transnational approach might be more fruitful to the study of film. As the empirical categorization that encompass films produced, sponsored or filmed by people of Italian nationalities, Italian cinema is no exception. In this seminar we will study co-productions, films made by non-nationals in Italy and Italians abroad, travel films, colonial and post-colonial filmic texts, films on emigrant communities or those that depict Italian workers abroad, and international co-productions that question whether an “Italian cinema” even exists. We will look at the films themselves, at their production history, and also their reception and distribution patterns, in film theaters and in places as varied as the Pentagon and business fairs. Primary material will include The Battle of Algiers, We the Living, Terminal Station/Indiscretion of an American Wife, the films produced abroad by the masters of Italian cinema including Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Tinto Brass, and Bernardo Bertolucci, Once upon a Time in America, Roberto Rossellini’s India, Holocaust films like Seven Beauties and The Night Porter, Mondo movies, and the films shot in English by a new generation of Italian directors – including  Call me by your name. The goals of this seminar are twofold: on the one hand, we will reimagine the history of Italian cinema as a transnational enterprise; on the other hand, the seminar will convey a general methodology that can be employed for the study of other cinematic traditions.

Open to all graduate students and qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Screenings will be organized according to students’ schedule.

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To find course availability and times, please visit the Ohio State Course Catalog and Master Schedule.