Spring 2020 Course Offerings

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The Department of French and Italian offers a great variety of courses including undergraduate, graduate, GE, and introductory language courses. ​Students in our courses learn to think critically, discover the appreciation of other cultures, and gain proficiency in a second language. Courses cover all periods of literary, cultural and intellectual history, in-depth specializations in post-colonial studies, medieval, Enlightenment, and modern literature and culture; film studies; literary and cultural theory; historical linguistics; and second-language acquisition.

The most up-to-date list of course offerings is always available via View Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

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French 1801 - Masterpieces of the French-Speaking World

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French 1801 Masterpieces of the French-Speaking World

Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, WF 2:20 - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English. Format: lecture and discussion.

Discover ‘masterpieces’ of French Literature:

  • Explore French regions through short stories, Asterix, and tasting local specialties 
  • Gain a sense of French history while learning the mechanics of different poetry styles
  • Read Molière's hilarious comedies mocking hypocrisy
  • …and Flaubert's masterpiece novel, Madame Bovary
  • Work on techniques for reading faster and better
  • Become a better critic and observer of your own culture 

French 1802 - Cultures of the French Speaking World: Comics and French/Francophone Cultures

7-Week Session 2: Professor Maggie Flinn, WF 2:20-5:05 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Cultures and Ideas. Taught in English.

In this class we will study comic books and graphic novels of the Franco-Belgian tradition (“bande dessinée”), particularly as they engage in questions of the representation of cultures and identities. As a form of pop culture production, with both a specialized and eclectic readership, comics are a privileged location for addressing socio-cultural issues that often have a harder time breaking in to more highly regimented cultural spheres. Nonetheless, comics in the French-speaking world have attained a cultural legitimacy that makes them highly influential as an art form. This class is taught IN ENGLISH and we will read comics in English translation from a variety of French-speaking countries that deal with social issues such as race, immigration/migration, climate change, war, sexuality, disability, national identities, etc.


French 2801 - Classics of French Cinema

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French 2801 Classics of French Cinema

Professor Maggie Flinn, WF 9:35 - 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

GE Visual and Performing Arts. Taught in English.

This course functions as an introduction to the study of French cinema with a focus on the “Classic” period, the 1930s-1960s, that is, from early sound cinema through the French New Wave. Readings furnish film historical context and give examples of various scholarly approaches to the study of cinema. Students will be introduced to the critical vocabulary of formal and technical analysis, and will develop skills in argumentation based on such analysis through class discussion and writing assignments. A background in film studies or French cultural studies (literature, art history, language) is of course helpful, but NOT presumed—we will do exercises in basic shot-by-shot identification and formal analysis in the beginning weeks of the semester, cultural historical context will be introduced in lecture or readings as it is relevant to interpretation, and readings will be discussed both for their content and their methodological approaches to film. Language of instruction and readings is English, and all films are available in subtitled copies. 


Italian 2052 - Fictions of Italy: Modern and Contemporary Literature and Society

Professor Luca Peretti, MW 9:35 - 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

GE Literature; and Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

How did Italians imagine the rest of the world? And how did they see it in travels, explorations, migrations, and colonization? In this course we will look at the ways in which the East, the West and South of the world has been recounted in Italian culture.

Travelers, colonizers, migrants, explorers: Italians have traversed the globe for different reasons and in distinct ways. In this course we will examine Italian cultural mobility from the 18th century to the present through films, memoirs, books, chronicles, operas, letters, and travel guides. We will look at the many waves of Italian migration to North and South America, at the role of Italian explorers and adventurers in “exotic” places around the world, and even Italian colonizers in Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean from the largely forgotten but key period of colonialism and decolonization whose history we will construct. Our goal throughout will be to examine the traces of Italian culture around the world, and of world cultures within Italy. Italy is a site for tourism and exploration, and a place of arrival and departure; a place where people immigrate – especially at present with the arrivals of migrants from Africa, Middle East and Eastern Europe – and one with a strong history of emigration. This dynamic will be at the heart of this course, in order to highlight the fluidity, diversity, and composite nature of a national culture.


Italian 2053 - Italian Cinema

Instructor Giuliano Migliori, Second 7-week session: TR 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

This course presents students with an overview of Italian cinema of the last seventy years and looks at films and serial television by important Italian directors. We touch upon major genres and movements in Italian screen history, including Neorealism, comedy Italian style, political cinema, the woman’s film, the spaghetti western, mafia movies, the film noir, coming-of-age film, the docudrama, and quality television.


Italian 2055 - Mafia Movies

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Italian 2055 Mafia Movies

Professor Dana Renga, WF 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization pervades almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Ciro di Marzio, Peppino Impastato, Roberto Saviano, Christopher Moltisanti, and Donnie Brasco are some of the figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits, and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema and television treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender, and representations of violence and alluring criminals.


Italian 2061 - Mediterranean Food Culture

Professor Harry Kashdan, TR 12:45-2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Culture and Ideas, and Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

The “Mediterranean Diet” is regularly the subject of breathless speculation in the press. Can olive oil really make you live longer? Is red wine actually good for you? This course uses the popular image of the “Mediterranean Diet” and the associated Mediterranean lifestyle as the jumping off point for an inquiry into the role of food in Mediterranean culture. We will investigate the role of the culinary in Mediterranean identities and pay close attention to how residents of different Mediterranean countries approach the foods of their neighbors. Does a Greek find Turkish food familiar or alien? What does a Tunisian eat in France? How does what we eat matter? What about when, where, and with whom? We will approach these questions through close readings of fiction, cookbooks, and films about Mediterranean food, which we will supplement with selections from scholarly sources on Mediterranean food culture. We will explore culinary metaphors and the relationships between cuisine and language, while discovering what kinds of tools we need to study food as a cultural product.


Italian 3051 - The Crossroads of Romance: Tales of Heroes and Monsters from the Odyssey to Star Wars

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Italian 3051 The Crossroads of Romance

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Literature, and Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

Knights of the Round Table, Amazon warriors, wild-west gunslingers, intergalactic Jedi—these heroic archetypes are linked by the narrative strategy and ideological structures of romance. In this course, students will learn about the medieval precedents for these wandering heroes (and heroines); and investigate the enduring influence of romance narrative on how stories are told and communities are represented. We will begin with its classical roots (Homer’s Odyssey) and contemporary works that either synthesize or, like Monty Python’s Holy Grail, satirize the genre to become familiar with its conventions. We will then read medieval and renaissance “classics” of the genre, before turning to recent stories shaped by romance, from the historical spy novel to Star Wars: Rogue One. Our focus will be the titanic impact of romance on representations of European cultural values and its frequently problematic depiction of foreign cultures (esp. the Middle East). Throughout, we will ask the question: has romance been a site for the “clash of civilizations,” a space for multicultural exchange, or both?

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Please refer to the Schedule of Classes via BuckeyeLink to view days and times of these offerrings.

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French 3101 French Grammar Review

French 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103.01 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1101.51, 1102.51, 1103.51 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Instruction (2-4 credit hours)

French 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Distance Learning (2-4 credit hours)

French 1155.01 - Beginning French Review Classroom (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.03, 1102.03, 1103.03 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Blended (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.71, 1102.71, 1103.71 - Beginning Italian II and III Online (4 credit hours)

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French 2101.01 - Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Section 18803: Instructor TBA, TR 2:20 - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 25936: Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 9:35-10:55am, 3 credit hours

This course serves as the bridge between the beginning language courses (1101-1103) and upper-level French courses.  By emphasizing all skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), it will prepare you for further work in language, literature, and culture and for a minor or major in French.  You will be introduced to a variety of texts (both literary and cultural), as well as to music and films from France and other francophone countries.  Close reading and analysis will be emphasized. Because knowledge of language impacts the ability to read and interpret a text, grammar is also a component of the course. 


French 2101.01H - Honors Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

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René Magritte
René Magritte

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 2:20 - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

How can the act of opening a door constitute poetry? Why do contemporary French musicians make use of seventeenth and nineteenth century writers such as La Fontaine and Rimbaud? Is hip-hop poetry? Are love and war related topics? Why is Camus still the best selling author in France? Is the French spoken in Quebec still “French”? How do gender and ethnicity alter language and culture? Join us as we answer these and other questions pertinent to French and francophone studies, on a journey that will take us from France to Quebec, Algeria, Martinique, and other countries. Representative works from literature and the media will be read in conjunction with music and film.

This course prepares students for further work in culture, literature, composition, and conversation. Students will gain proficiency in analyzing literary texts and media materials. They are expected to engage in lively class discussions and give oral presentations. Writing is also an essential component of the course. There will be an intensive peer-edited writing workshop that will prepare you for advanced writing in French. The course will also introduce students to the workings of undergraduate research.

Non-honors students are welcome, but need the permission of the instructor to enroll. (marx-scouras.1)


French 3101 - French Grammar Review

Section 18804: Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, MWF 12:40-1:35 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 28579: Instructor TBA, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

In this course you will find all the information that you need to speak and write like the French. Review grammar you've seen, learn some you haven't, and practice translations in order to rid your French of those pesky anglicismes! We will look at usage examples in French popular songs, film clips, and short readings, and do plenty of conversation.


French 3102 - French Pronunciation and Performance

Instructor TBA, WF 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Formation of French sounds, rules of pronunciation and diction.  Reading and performing poems, excerpts from plays, public performances, television or film scripts. 


French 3103 - French Conversation

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French 3103 French Conversation
Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, WF 3:55 - 5:15 pm, 3 credit hours
 

Prereq: French 3101 and at least one (but preferably two) additional 3000 or higher courses.

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Watch Monsieur Nobek Teaches Français From Saturday Night Live

L'accent - Fabulous Trobador

“Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Si tu peux le parler allez tombez la chemise” (Art vs. Science)

Several decades ago, a colleague asked me why I was teaching slang in my conversation course considering that the students had not mastered French. I replied: “What’s ‘French’?”.

What’s “French” anyway? What does it mean to “master” a language? When someone tells you, “Mais vous n’avez aucun accent,” what are they actually saying? Is slang French? Is Marseillais French? What about French spoken in Quebec and Africa? These are only a few of the questions we shall address in this course.

As we listen to and practice French in a variety of contexts, we shall reflect on what it means for us–as individuals–to speak “French”.  I hope that each one of you will find your own idiolect amidst the endless possibilities that this local, national and world language affords us: an idiolect in which you affirm your unique identity and fluency.

You are expected to attend and actively participate in every single class. No perks for wallflowers! Please practice projecting your voice before the onset of the course so that everyone can hear you from the moment you arrive!

Quelques voix pour vous inspirer!

Recent OSU distinguished invited speaker Ta-Nehisi Coates (Middlebury French language program) (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Bradley Cooper (Studied in Aix-en-Provence for six months)

Angela Davis (French major at Brandeis University, junior year abroad in Paris)

Jodie Foster (attended the Lycée Français in LA)

Shan Sa (French writer)

Jack Kerouac (French-American writer of the Beat Generation)

Kim Thuy (Quebec writer)

David Sedaris (from Me Talk Pretty One Day)


French 3202 - Literary and Visual Texts of the Francophone World

Instructor TBA, TR 2:20-3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Readings and analysis of Francophone literary and multimedia texts that provide an appreciation and understanding of the French-speaking world.


French 3301 - Discovering Second Language Acquisition

Professor Wynne Wong, TR 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Taught in English

This course introduces undergraduate students to the exciting field of second language acquisition. This course is ideal for language learners who wish to reflect on and improve their own language learning experience, for those who desire to become language instructors, and for anyone who simply has an interest in languages. The questions we will explore include:

  • Is second language acquisition like first language acquisition?
  • Does the first language help or get in the way of SLA?
  • Why do children become universally native-like but second language learners seem not to?
  • Why do we make errors in a second language (or at least appear to)?
  • Is there a best way to teach languages?
  • I took 4 years of Spanish and got all As so why am I not fluent?
  • What’s the difference between learning two languages from birth as opposed to learning a second language later in life?
  • What about individual differences like motivation and aptitude?
  • Why do I still have an accent?

French 3401 - Introduction to Contemporary France

Instructor Beth Bishop, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

Learn about the social, cultural, and political history of France from World War II to the present, then explore contemporary French culture and the often bewildering differences between it and American culture. In what ways do the French think about money, sex, religion, politics, Europe, and the United States? How does the multi-cultural make-up of contemporary France complicate the answers to these questions? Come find out!


French 3403 - La Cuisine Française: Gastronomic Culture, Language, and Expression

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French 3403 French Cuisine
Professor Sarah-Grace Heller, WF 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours
 
Taste fabulous French specialties and learn to cook to some simple and classic French dishes. Explore French and Francophone cultural ideas around dining, good table manners, and the meanings of food through short readings. We will spice things up with a pinch of grammar (sorry, cheesy metaphor!) and plenty of conversation. Learn to read and translate recipes. Discuss and write about your personal experiences with food and with experiencing other cultures. This will be a hands-on, practical, delicious language course.

French 4100 - Advanced Grammar: Grammar Through Current Events

Instructor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, WF 9:35-10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Why study advanced French grammar if you are interested in international affairs? Human rights? Food?  Finance?  Migrants?  Medicine? To follow these issues in the francophone media, you need to master the written language by becoming a more educated, informed reader, as well as a more skilled, articulate writer of French. 

This course replaces FR 5101 and is required for the French major for those have not yet taken 5101. Students who have already taken 5101 cannot register for this course.


French 4401 - Drawing cultures: Comics in the Francophone world

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French 4401 Drawing cultures: Comics in the Francophone world

Professor Maggie Flinn, WF 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Dans ce cours, nous lirons des bandes dessinées de la “tradition franco-belge” (l’une des trois grandes traditions de la représentation graphique en série, les autres étant les “comics” américains et les “mangas” japonais.) Nous nous intéresserons d’abord à l’analyse de cet objet : comment la lire et l’analyser en détail. Ensuite, on s’adressera à la question de la représentation de la culture à travers ce médium. Nous lirons des textes sur les questions telles que le statut social des femmes, le changement climatique, la migration et l’immigration, la maladie et le handicap, la représentation de l’histoire, la classe sociale et la politique, etc. Nous regarderons également en contrepoint quelques films d’animation.


French 5204 - Lethal Literature: Representations of Murder in 20th-Century French Fiction and Culture

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French 5204 Lethal Literature: Representations of Murder in 20th-Century French Fiction and Culture

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Come explore murder and its diverse representations in 20th-century France. We will examine French cultural attitudes toward and interest in murder and related phenomena such as newspaper faits divers (human interest stories), detective fiction, le crime passionnel, crime rates, capital punishment, and violence committed against and by women.


French 5403 - Topics in French-Speaking Cultures and Literatures: Marseille, the City with a ‘bad rap’

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French 5403
Bleu de Chine by Bruno Catalano, Marseille

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

“But what nobody can deny, unless they are of bad faith, is that Marseille is not one, but multiple. It is multicultural, multiracial and, of course, multi-musical. The people of Marseille sing in several languages, just as we think and dream in several languages.” (Jean-Claude Izzo)

Bons Baisers de Marseille / Moussu T E Lei Jovents.

L'Algérino - Sur La Tete De Ma Mère (Clip Officiel HD)

Keny Arkana - Capitale de la Rupture (Clip Officiel)

In 2013, France’s oldest and second largest city made international news as European Cultural Capital. Thanks in large part to articles in the media (the NYT placed Marseille second, after Brazil, as the place to visit that year), American tourists no longer shunned the Phocean port city of sailors, prostitutes, and drugs rendered notorious by the “French Connection.” We shall explore what makes this Mediterranean city unique and examine how the representation of Marseille in literature, music, and film provides a new perspective on France: “Marseille, c’est pas la France” reads the popular slogan on tee shirts for tourists. Marseille is the perfect mescla (provençal for mêlée, mélange) for a multilingual, cross-cultural, transnational and multimedia encounter that will allow us to pedagogically test and intellectually tackle burning questions pertaining to “Frenchness” and “foreignness.”

Music by Massilia Sound System, IAM, Moussu T e lei Jovents, Keny Arkana et al. Readings by such authors as Walter Benjamin, Claude McKay, Jean-Claude Izzo, Olivier Boura, Albert Londres, and André Suarès. Films include The French Connection II and La Ville est tranquille.  A video concert is also planned. Taught in French.

(If you have trouble registering for the course—there have been problems in the past with 5403—please email marx-scouras.1 and cc afanasyeva.1.)

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French 5204 - Lethal Literature: Representations of Murder in 20th-Century French Fiction and Culture

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French 5204 Lethal Literature: Representations of Murder in 20th-Century French Fiction and Culture

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 12:45 - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Come explore murder and its diverse representation sin 20th-century France. We will examine French cultural attitudes toward and interest in murder and related phenomena such as newspaper faits divers (human interest stories), detective fiction, le crime passionnel, crime rates, capital punishment, and violence committed against and by women.


French 5403 - Topics in French-Speaking Cultures and Literatures: Marseille, the City with a ‘bad rap’ 

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French 5403
Bleu de Chine by Bruno Catalano, Marseille

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 11:10-12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

“But what nobody can deny, unless they are of bad faith, is that Marseille is not one, but multiple. It is multicultural, multiracial and, of course, multi-musical. The people of Marseille sing in several languages, just as we think and dream in several languages.” (Jean-Claude Izzo)

 

Bons Baisers de Marseille / Moussu T E Lei Jovents.

L'Algérino - Sur La Tete De Ma Mère (Clip Officiel HD)

Keny Arkana - Capitale de la Rupture (Clip Officiel)

 

In 2013, France’s oldest and second largest city made international news as European Cultural Capital. Thanks in large part to articles in the media (the NYT placed Marseille second, after Brazil, as the place to visit that year), American tourists no longer shunned the Phocean port city of sailors, prostitutes, and drugs rendered notorious by the “French Connection.” We shall explore what makes this Mediterranean city unique and examine how the representation of Marseille in literature, music, and film provides a new perspective on France: “Marseille, c’est pas la France” reads the popular slogan on tee shirts for tourists. Marseille is the perfect mescla (provençal for mêlée, mélange) for a multilingual, cross-cultural, transnational and multimedia encounter that will allow us to pedagogically test and intellectually tackle burning questions pertaining to “Frenchness” and “foreignness.”

Music by Massilia Sound System, IAM, Moussu T e lei Jovents, Keny Arkana et al. Readings by such authors as Walter Benjamin, Claude McKay, Jean-Claude Izzo, Olivier Boura, Albert Londres, and André Suarès. Films include The French Connection II and La Ville est tranquille.  A video concert is also planned. Taught in French.

(If you have trouble registering for the course—there have been problems in the past with 5403—please email marx-scouras.1 and cc afanasyeva.1.)


French 8302 - Issues in Second Language Acquisition: Vocabulary Acquisition: Theory, Research, and Classroom Practice

Professor Wynne Wong, Thursday 2:20-5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English

The acquisition of vocabulary may be the most important component of learning a new language. When language learners have a robust mental lexicon, they can get their meaning across in most communicative situations even with limited grammatical knowledge. This seminar explores vocabulary learning with an emphasis on lexical input processing. The course examines theoretical and pedagogical implications of research on vocabulary acquisition, including the development of materials and activities for the classroom. Topics in the course include (but are not limited to):

  • theoretical underpinnings that underlie research on vocabulary acquisition;
  • specificity in type of processing and learning;
  • incidental and intentional vocabulary learning;
  • lexical input processing and implications for instruction;
  • principles of effective vocabulary instruction;
  • evaluating vocabulary instructional techniques;
  • creating effective vocabulary activities for the classroom;
  • designing a research proposal to investigate an issue in lexical acquisition.
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Italian 2102 - Contemporary Italian Studies

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Italian 2102 Contemporary Italian Studies

Instructor TBA, TR 11:10 - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course you will learn about a variety of aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture, while at the same time focusing on the four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Since you are transitioning from the elementary to the intermediate level, at this point more emphasis will be placed on developing your reading skills, so you will be exposed to a lot of authentic Italian in different genres. (However, your listening, writing, and speaking skills will not be ignored!) You will learn techniques to improve your reading in Italian and you will progress from reading relatively short texts to reading a short novel. Grammar will be reviewed and tested throughout the course. The targeted structures are: irregular plurals of nouns and adjectives, the forms and functions of the regular and some irregular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns; the passato prossimo, the imperfect, and the past perfect (trapassato prossimo), and the remote past.


Italian 3222 - Modern Italian Media 

Instructor April Weintritt, MW 2:20 - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

What, in today's Italy, is modern media? In which ways are media, specifically mass media and artistic media, consistent and in which ways are they constantly changing? Through a variety of case studies from contemporary society and culture, authentic texts from diverse genres will help us explore representation and authority in Italy today.

In this course, we will improve our communicative and discursive abilities: speaking, writing, reading, and listening. Reviewing and expanding upon grammatical structures is a key component to improving our language proficiency skills and intercultural competence; targeted structures in this course include: the forms and functions of irregular and some regular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect discourse, past tense forms (some new ones!) and the future tense.


Italian 5101 - Intensive Italian, GE Foreign Language

Instructor TBA, MWF 11:10-12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.


Italian 5194 - Studies in Italian Culture

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Italian 5194 Studies in Italian Culture

Professor Luca Peretti, MW 12:45-2:05pm, 3 credit hours

In this class we look at a series of key themes in Italian culture. While the course follows (loose) chronological criteria, the themes that we will study have been chosen because they reappear constantly in different periods of Italian history. Each week, rather than just describing the subject matter, we will reconstruct the debate around these issues: from the different interpretations on the process of the Italian unification, to the diverging ways of intending migrations in and out of Italy, and the ideas on how to tackle the “Southern question”.

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Italian 5101 - Intensive Italian, GE Foreign Language

Instructor TBA, MWF 11:10-12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.


Italian 5194 - Studies in Italian Culture

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Italian 5194 Studies in Italian Culture

Professor Luca Peretti, MW 12:45-2:05pm, 3 credit hours

In this class we look at a series of key themes in Italian culture. While the course follows (loose) chronological criteria, the themes that we will study have been chosen because they reappear constantly in different periods of Italian history. Each week, rather than just describing the subject matter, we will reconstruct the debate around these issues: from the different interpretations on the process of the Italian unification, to the diverging ways of intending migrations in and out of Italy, and the ideas on how to tackle the “Southern question”.