Spring 2022 Course Offerings

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The most up-to-date list of course offerings is always available via View Schedule of Classes on BuckeyeLink.

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FRIT (French and Italian) 2061 - Mediterranean Food Culture

Doctor Mark Anthony Arceno, In Person, TR 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Culture and Ideas, GE Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

FRIT 2061 Image

What do bacalhau, falafel, moussaka, paella, ratatouille, risotto, spanakopita, tabbaouleh, and tagines have in common (other than perhaps making your mouth water)? They are among a host of diverse dishes that represent the rich, complex, and migratory tapestry of “Mediterranean food.” Considering food as more than just a biological necessity, this course approaches food as a way of talking about culture and identity in an ever-changing world full of human and environmental interactions. How does the food we and others eat help define the spaces we inhabit and call home? What do changing landscapes mean for the availability of ingredients we might otherwise take for granted? In what ways are these relationships represented in film, literature, music, and social media? With specific regard to local, regional, and national traditions of countries that surround the Mediterranean Sea, we will spend our semester together learning about the “taste of place” and why it is so difficult to define.

This course can count as a course taught in English towards FRIT minors and majors. Please consult specific degree requirements for more information.


Italian 2053 - Introduction to Italian Cinema

Doctor Giuliano Migliori, 7-week session 2, In Person, TR 2:20 pm – 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

Italian 2053 image

This course presents students with an overview of Italian cinema of the last seventy years and looks at films and serial television by important Italian directors. We touch upon major genres and movements in Italian screen history, including Neorealism, comedy Italian style, political cinema, the woman’s film, the spaghetti western, mafia movies, the film noir, coming-of-age film, the docudrama, and quality television.

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.


Italian 2055 - Mafia Movies

Instructor TBA, ONLINE, WF 12:45pm – 1:40 pm, 3 credit hours

*This class is fully online. Distance synchronous WF 12:45-1:40 with asynchronous components.

GE Visual Performing Arts and Diversity Global Studies. Taught in English. 

Italian 2055 image

The Mafia in Italy is referred to as an octopus as the organization pervades almost every facet of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, Ciro di Marzio, Peppino Impastato, Roberto Saviano, Christopher Moltisanti, and Donnie Brasco are some of the figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American Mafias. In this course we watch Italian and American mafia movie and television hits, and explore the myth of the Mafia that is so widespread in America, and trace its history as it passes across time and through multiple cultures. We will question whether there exists a unique American or Italian cinema and television treating the Mafia and explore how filmmakers from the two countries approach the subject in dissimilar fashions, especially in terms of stereotyping, gender, and representations of violence and alluring criminals.

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.


French 2801 - French Popular Cinema

French 2801

Doctor Mackenzie Leadston, In Person, TR 3:55 pm - 5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Visual Performing Arts Course. Taught in English.

This class serves as an introduction to French cinema, focusing primarily on popular films. It will present an overview of films and television from the past hundred years while examining how cultural policy and social context influenced the films’ production and reception. We will explore diverse genres and time periods, from early silent cinema to recent television series. We will discuss topics such as how French comedy is distinct from other national cinemas, whether Taken is considered a French film, the debate between popular and art cinema, and how French cinema and television has evolved to respond to a shifting national identity. The course is taught in English with all films available subtitled. No background in French or film studies necessary.  

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the French or French and Francophone Studies majors (as well as toward the French minor under certain conditions).


Italian 3051 – Italian Romances

Professor Jonathan Combs-Schilling, In Person, WF 11:10 am – 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

GE Literature, GE Diversity: Global Studies. Taught in English.

Italian 3051 image

Knights of the Round Table, Amazon warriors, wild-west gunslingers, intergalactic Jedi—these heroic archetypes are linked by the narrative strategy and ideological structures of romance. In this course we examine the enduring influence of romance narrative on how stories are told and communities are represented today. We will begin with the classical and medieval origins of this kind of storytelling (like Homer’s Odyssey) and a few contemporary works (like Monty Python’s Holy Grail) that satirize the genre to become familiar with its conventions. We will then read medieval and renaissance “classics” of the genre, before turning to recent stories that bear the trace of romance, from an historical spy novel to Star Wars: Rogue One. Our focus will be the titanic impact of romance on representations of European cultural values and its frequently problematic depiction of foreign cultures (esp. those of the Middle East). Throughout, we will ask the question: has romance been a site for the “clash of civilizations,” a space for multicultural exchange, or both? 

This course can count as a course taught in English toward the Italian minor and the Italian or Italian Studies majors.

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Please refer to the Schedule of Classes via BuckeyeLink to view days and times of these offerrings. 

French 3101 French Grammar Review

French 1101.01, 1102.01, 1103.01 - Beginning French I, II, and III Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1101.21, 1102.21, 1103.21 - Beginning French I, II, and III Distance Learning (4 credit hours)

French 1101.61, 1102.61, 1103.61 - Beginning French I, II, and III Individualized Distance Learning (2-4 credit hours)

French 1155.01 - Beginning French Review Classroom (4 credit hours)

French 1155.21 - Beginning French Review Distance Learning (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.03, 1102.03, 1103.03 - Beginning Italian I, II, and III Blended (4 credit hours)

Italian 1101.71, 1102.71, 1103.71 - Beginning Italian II and III Online (4 credit hours)


Italian 5101 – Intensive Italian

Doctor Giuliano Migliori, MWF 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

GE Foreign Language

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

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French 2101.01 – Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

French 2101.01 Image

Section 13445: Instructor TBD, TR 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 20251: Doctor Kate Schlosser, WF 9:35 am – 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Welcome to the threshold to the French minor and major! In French 2101.01, you will have the opportunity to practice and improve your reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in French, as well as to continue learning about French and Francophone literatures and cultures through reading, viewing, and interpreting authentic literary and visual texts from around the Francophone world.

 


French 3101 - French Grammar Review

French 3101 image

Section 13446: Doctor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, MWF 12:40 pm – 1:35 pm, 3 credit hours

Section 22397: Doctor Julie Parson, TR 11:10am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course you will find all the information that you need to speak and write like the French. Review grammar you've seen, learn some you haven't, and practice translations in order to rid your French of those pesky anglicismes! We will look at usage examples in French popular songs, film clips, and short readings, and do plenty of conversation.


French 3102 - French Pronunciation and Performance

Doctor Kathryn Schlosser, WF 11:10am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Parlez-vous français ?  In this class you will!  Newly revamped, French 3102 aims to guide all students toward more accurate pronunciation of the French language in its many iterations throughout the francophone world.  We will learn a new alphabet, review rules of pronunciation and diction, then put this knowledge to use through the performance of songs, poetry and plays. We will use film, television and YouTube to explore who speaks French and how they do it. After this class, you will never look at or listen to French the same again! 


French 3103 - French Conversation

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, 7 week session 2: WF 2:20 pm – 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours
 
French 3103 image

*This course in not open to native and near-native students.

Watch Monsieur Nobek Teach Français From Saturday Night Live

L'accent - Fabulous Trobadors

“Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Parlez-vous Français?

Oui!

Si tu peux le parler allez tombez la chemise” (Art vs. Science)

Several decades ago, a colleague asked me why I was teaching slang in my conversation course considering that the students had not mastered French. I replied: “What’s ‘French’?”.

What’s “French” anyway? What does it mean to “master” a language? When someone tells you, “Mais vous n’avez aucun accent,” what are they actually saying? Is slang French? Is Marseillais French? What about French spoken in Quebec and Africa? These are only a few of the questions we shall address in this course.

As we listen to and practice French in a variety of contexts, we shall reflect on what it means for us–as individuals–to speak “French”.  I hope that each one of you will find your own idiolect amidst the endless possibilities that this local, national and world language affords us: an idiolect in which you affirm your unique identity and fluency.

You are expected to attend and actively participate in every single class. No perks for wallflowers! Please practice projecting your voice before the onset of the course so that everyone can hear you from the moment you arrive!

Quelques voix pour vous inspirer!

Recent OSU distinguished invited speaker Ta-Nehisi Coates (Middlebury French language program) (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Bradley Cooper (Studied in Aix-en-Provence for six months)

Angela Davis (French major at Brandeis University, junior year abroad in Paris)

Jodie Foster (attended the Lycée Français in LA)

Shan Sa (French writer)

Jack Kerouac (French-American writer of the Beat Generation)

Kim Thuy (Quebec writer)

David Sedaris (from Me Talk Pretty One Day)


French 3202 – Literary and visual texts of the Francophone World

French 3202 image

Doctor Adela Lechintan-Siefer, WF 12:45pm - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

This course, taught in French, is multimedia in nature, thereby reflecting the rich literary, cinematographic, and musical diversity of the francophone world. One of our goals will be to understand the ways in which texts, films and music connect to give us an aesthetic, cultural, political and historical understanding and appreciation of France and several Francophone countries.


FRIT (French and Italian) 3301 – Discovering Second Language Acquisition

Professor Wynne Wong, TR 9:35 am – 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

French 3301

Taught in English. Students of all language backgrounds welcome.

Course Video Intro

Do you like languages? Are you currently learning a language and wish to understand how to learn it better? Do you hope to teach languages one day? Second Language Acquisition (SLA) is a field that is devoted to understanding and explaining the processes that underlie the learning of another language after one has already acquired a first language. How does second language acquisition happen? How do we create a new linguistic system in our heads?

This course introduces undergraduate students to the exciting field of second language acquisition. This course is ideal for language learners who wish to reflect on and improve their own language learning experience, for those who desire to become language instructors, and for anyone who simply has an interest in languages. The questions we will explore include:

  • Is second language acquisition like first language acquisition?
  • Does the first language help or get in the way of SLA?
  • Why do children become universally native-like but second language learners seem not to?
  • Why do we make errors in a second language (or at least appear to)?
  • I took 4 years of Spanish and got all As so why am I not fluent?
  • What’s the difference between learning two languages from birth as opposed to learning a second language later in life?
  • What about individual differences like motivation and aptitude?
  • Why do I still have an accent?
  • Is there a best way to teach languages?
  • How do I design pedagogical practice to facilitate second language acquisition?

You will have the opportunity to design and teach a brief mini online language lesson in the language of your choice.


French 3502 – French for International Studies

Doctor Adela Lechintan-Siefer, TR 12:45 pm – 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

French 3502 image

In this course, taught in French, we will learn about the relations between French-speaking countries and international organizations as well as current events in the French-speaking world by reading short articles, watching news reports and mini-documentaries, participating in debates, and writing short essays in French. Students will develop intercultural competence and language skills that they can use in international studies, diplomacy, human rights, journalism, and other professional contexts.


French 4100 - Advanced French Grammar through Current Events

Doctor Gloria Torrini-Roblin, ONLINE, WF 9:35 am – 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

Les vieux messieurs que promènent les chiens sont très distingués !  Who is holding the leash?  If you think it’s the distinguished elderly gentlemen, look again!

The formal syntax of this sentence is not normally used in daily speech.  “So why learn this pretentious (or if you prefer, hifalutin) French?” you ask.

Here’s one answer:  the Francophone press is replete with stylistic twists and grammatical turns that the reader must recognize to make sense of not only what is happening in the French-speaking world, but also how their journalists view others.

 Climate change: what is being done in France?  Immigration:  What is the experience of west African migrants? Civil rights: who is Joyce Echaquan?  Adama Traore? Politics:  what does it mean that Canadian Prime Minister is labeled a “libéral”?   Health care: what is the Passport santé and how does it work?  Chocolate:  good or bad?  (which francophone countries “produce” the raw beans and which transform it?)

If you prefer, flip the perspective.  How did the Haitian press respond to vulgar insults from its northern neighbor?  What does the Quebecois media have to say about oil pipelines or firearms south of its border?  

The class will equip you to read multiple points of view from across the French-speaking world.  Students will study advanced French grammar even as they put it to the test in weekly online discussions.  The topics?  You choose!  Share articles of interest to you and respond to those of your peers.  By the end of the class, you will be able to engage accurately and meaningfully with Francophone perspectives on current events.


French 4401 – Le roman policier

French 4401

Professor Jennifer Willging, TR 3:55 pm - 5:15 pm, 3 credit hours

If you grew up loving detective fiction, you’ll enjoy discovering new enigmas in the French tradition, from 19th-century whodunnits inspired by Edgar Allen Poe’s The Murders in the Rue Morgue (which takes place, as you might guess, in Paris), to 20th-century thrillers, to 21st-century pastiches of the genre. Also included in the course will be works by authors who, rather than specializing in le roman policier, take advantage of some of its particular structures and tropes to expose a number of social ills. In addition, we’ll view some cinematic adaptions of romans policiers, considering how adapting these texts to the screen might enrich them in certain ways and impoverish them in others. So come explore France’s fictional underworld while at the same time improving your reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in French.

Prerequisites: FR 3101 and one of the following: 3201, 3202, 3401, 3403, 3501, 3502.


FRIT (French and Italian) 5051 - Latin and Romance Languages

FRIT 5051

Professor Fernando Martinez-Gil, TR 12:45 pm - 2:20 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

We all know that the Romance languages are similar because they derive from Latin. But did you ever wonder how the differences among the languages developed? That is, how exactly do the words for ‘fire’ in each of the Romance languages (It. fuoco, Sp. fuego, Port. fogo, Fr. feu, Rom. Foc) relate to Latin FŎCU? Latin had a case system for nouns. Does it still exist in any of the Romance languages? If the comparative in Italian and French derives from Latin PLUS (> It. più, Fr. plus), why is the Spanish comparative different (mas)? In this course, students will develop acute analytical skills by comparing and contrasting phonological (sound) morphological (words) and syntactic (word order) changes in order to identify the linguistic processes that applied in each Romance language. In addition, we will examine the socio‐historical factors, such as the expansion of the Roman Empire and its dissolution, which contributed to the formation of the Romance languages and their divergences. Finally, students will acquire an understanding of linguistic systematicity which will enhance further studies in the language(s) of their choice, while investigation of exceptional, or unexpected developments will provide insight into the complicated nature of language change. 


French 5403 – "Minor Art” from Gainsbourg to Stromae: Popular Music as a Political Act

French 5403

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

“L'évolution de la langue française/Ça vient de la rue…” (IAM) “Poète... circulez!” (Léo Ferré)

The iconoclast, Serge Gainsbourg, considered popular music a “minor art.” In this course, open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, we shall examine how a “minor art” can subvert language, transgress cultural norms, and rock identity politics. Our musical repertoire will take us from the 1950s to the present. Songs and clips will be studied in conjunction with film and media materials, as well as historical and critical texts. This course will be taught in French.

Required Texts

All course materials will be online, available on Carmen, or distributed as handouts in class.

Recommended: Larousse Dictionnaire du Francais Argotique et Populaire by Caradec and Pouy.

Graduate students will be expected to read theoretical texts such as Barthes’ Leçon, Deleuze and Guattari’s Kafka: pour un art mineur, Foucault’s L’Ordre du discours, as well as texts by other authors such as Paulo Freire, Antonio Gramsci, Stuart Hall, and Claude Sicre. They will choose these according to their research interests.

Undergraduate students should have taken at least 3101 plus an additional 3000 literature or culture course. Ideally, at least two 3000 or a 4000/5000 literature or culture course(s).

If you have trouble registering, please contact Sonya Afanasyeva or Andy Spencer.

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FRIT (French and Italian) 5051 - Latin and Romance Languages

FRIT 5051

Professor Fernando Martinez-Gil, TR 12:45 pm - 2:20 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

We all know that the Romance languages are similar because they derive from Latin. But did you ever wonder how the differences among the languages developed? That is, how exactly do the words for ‘fire’ in each of the Romance languages (It. fuoco, Sp. fuego, Port. fogo, Fr. feu, Rom. Foc) relate to Latin FŎCU? Latin had a case system for nouns. Does it still exist in any of the Romance languages? If the comparative in Italian and French derives from Latin PLUS (> It. più, Fr. plus), why is the Spanish comparative different (mas)? In this course, students will develop acute analytical skills by comparing and contrasting phonological (sound) morphological (words) and syntactic (word order) changes in order to identify the linguistic processes that applied in each Romance language. In addition, we will examine the socio‐historical factors, such as the expansion of the Roman Empire and its dissolution, which contributed to the formation of the Romance languages and their divergences. Finally, students will acquire an understanding of linguistic systematicity which will enhance further studies in the language(s) of their choice, while investigation of exceptional, or unexpected developments will provide insight into the complicated nature of language change. 


French 5403 – "Minor Art” from Gainsbourg to Stromae: Popular Music as a Political Act

French 5403

Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras, TR 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

“L'évolution de la langue française/Ça vient de la rue…” (IAM) “Poète... circulez!” (Léo Ferré)

The iconoclast, Serge Gainsbourg, considered popular music a “minor art.” In this course, open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, we shall examine how a “minor art” can subvert language, transgress cultural norms, and rock identity politics. Our musical repertoire will take us from the 1950s to the present. Songs and clips will be studied in conjunction with film and media materials, as well as historical and critical texts. This course will be taught in French.

Required Texts

All course materials will be online, available on Carmen, or distributed as handouts in class.

Recommended: Larousse Dictionnaire du Francais Argotique et Populaire by Caradec and Pouy.

Graduate students will be expected to read theoretical texts such as Barthes’ Leçon, Deleuze and Guattari’s Kafka: pour un art mineur, Foucault’s L’Ordre du discours, as well as texts by other authors such as Paulo Freire, Antonio Gramsci, Stuart Hall, and Claude Sicre. They will choose these according to their research interests.

Undergraduate students should have taken at least 3101 plus an additional 3000 literature or culture course. Ideally, at least two 3000 or a 4000/5000 literature or culture course(s).

If you have trouble registering, please contact Sonya Afanasyeva or Andy Spencer.


FRIT (French and Italian) 8302 – Issues in Second Language Acquisition: Input Processing, Structured Input, & Grammar Instruction: Theory, Research & Classroom Application

Professor Wynne Wong, Asynchronous ONLINE, 3 credit hours

FRIT 8302

Taught in English

Watch Course Video Intro

Course Delivery: This 3-credit course, offered by the Department of French & Italian at OSU, is taught in English, and delivered completely online in an asynchronous format. The course may be taken from anywhere at any time as long as assignments are completed by established due dates. Regular optional synchronous meetings are also available via Carmen Zoom.

Who Is This Course For?

This course is for anyone interested in second language studies/language teaching and will count toward the Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization (GIS) in Second Language Studies. Secondary education teachers are also welcome. FR 8301 is *not* a prerequisite for this course.

Course Description

Only input that has been processed can impact second language acquisition (SLA). Therefore, the study of input processing is integral to SLA research and for the development of effective pedagogical activities for classroom learning. While Corder (1967) was the first to make the distinction between input and intake, it was VanPatten’s (1996) model of input processing that provided the most elaborate account of how L2 learners derive intake from input by focusing on these critical questions: What input data do L2 learners attend to (and not attend to)? Why do they process certain data and not others? How does what they attend to (and not attend to) affect acquisition?

This course examines theoretical and instructional implications of research on input processing for the acquisition of grammar. You will be able to read research on input processing with a critical eye and understand the instructional implications of this research. You will learn how to create pedagogical interventions including structured input activities to help language learners process input better to support their acquisition of grammar.

Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • the nature of input processing (what gets and does not get processed and why);
  • current research trends in input processing;
  • the role of explicit explanation in input processing;
  • how processing instruction is different from other pedagogical interventions;
  • how to create structured input activities for the classroom;
  • how to create other input-based grammar activities to support the acquisition of grammar.

A variety of activities have been incorporated into this distance learning course to encourage student engagement and interaction, and to create an enjoyable online learning experience.

Different options for the final project are available to meet the needs and interests of different students taking the course.


FRIT (French and Italian) 8602 – Comparative French and Italian Studies: Ecocriticism and Popular Visual Culture

Professor Maggie Flinn, W 2:20 pm - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course we will read and watch French, Francophone, and Italian contemporary films, TV series, and comics that importantly represent the natural world and lend themselves to interpretation through an eco-critical framework. Of particular interest will be topics such as: documentary vs. fictional modes, other genres (cli-fi, crime fiction), political efficacy (militancy, aestheticism, etc.), scale (temporal & geographic), eg. hyperlocalism vs. globalization, eco-feminism, agriculture and culinary discourse (terroir, labor, food chains and legacies of Empire), toxicity and trash, environmental justice, Green and Blue imaginaries, etc. Language of instruction is English and all course viewings and readings area available subtitled/in English translation. Graduate students outside of FRIT may propose research topics on primary sources outside of the geographical/linguistic foci of the seminar, as long as they engage the courses’ theoretical framework.

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Italian 1198.71 - Italian on the Ground: A Pre-departure Course for Study and Travel in Italy 

Bologna, Italy, photo by Jonathan Combs-Schilling

Instructor TBA, 1 credit hour, Online, Asynchronous Distance Learning with weekly synchronous partner meetings 

This distance learning 1-credit hour course seeks to prepare you for an ‘on the ground’ experience in Italy through an introduction to language, culture, and intercultural reflections. This opportunity will enhance your experience and open your eyes to the many diverse aspects of Italian life that you will encounter while abroad.

Throughout these seven weeks we will learn phrases, expressions, vocabulary, and cultural insights that will help you succeed in a variety of communicative – verbal and nonverbal – situations. This knowledge is integrated with reflective tasks that will help prepare you for enhanced interactions and understanding with Italy, its peoples and cultures.


Italian 2102 - Contemporary Italian Studies

Doctor Ted Emery, TR 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm, 3 credit hours

Italian 2102 image

In this course you will learn about a variety of aspects of Italian contemporary society and culture, while at the same time focusing on the four language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Since you are transitioning from the elementary to the intermediate level, at this point more emphasis will be placed on developing your reading skills, so you will be exposed to a lot of authentic Italian in different genres. (However, your listening, writing, and speaking skills will not be ignored!) You will learn techniques to improve your reading in Italian and you will progress from reading relatively short texts to reading a short novel. Grammar will be reviewed and tested throughout the course. The targeted structures are: irregular plurals of nouns and adjectives, the forms and functions of the regular and some irregular present indicative verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns; the passato prossimo, the imperfect, and the past perfect (trapassato prossimo), and the remote past.


Italian 3222 - Modern Italian Media

Italian 3222

Doctor Ted Emery, WF 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 3 credit hours

This course provides extensive exposure to Italian media, used as a vehicle to study language and society. In Spring 2022  we will focus on cultural geographies in Italian cinema, studying how films reflect and play with a connection between a sense of place, social roles, and personal identity. The films to be studied are Roma città aperta (Roberto Rossellini, 1945), Roma (Federico Fellini, 1972) , Io speriamo che ma la cavo (Lina Wertmüller, 1992), Mine vaganti (Ferzan Özpetek, 2010), Pane e tulipani (Silvio Soldini, 1999) and shorter doumentary videos. Grammatical structures covered, in class or as independent review, include: piacere and similar verbs; direct and indirect object pronouns; ci and ne; formal/informal imperative (with object pronouns);common idiomatic expressions; dovere/potere/volere (passato prossimo and other tenses, correct usage); regular and irregular present tense verbs; and the possessive.


FRIT (French and Italian) 3301 – Discovering Second Language Acquisition

Professor Wynne Wong, ONLINE, TR 9:35 am – 10:55 am, 3 credit hours

French 3301

Taught in English. Students of all language backgrounds welcome.

Course Video Intro

Do you like languages? Are you currently learning a language and wish to understand how to learn it better? Do you hope to teach languages one day? Second Language Acquisition (SLA) is a field that is devoted to understanding and explaining the processes that underlie the learning of another language after one has already acquired a first language. How does second language acquisition happen? How do we create a new linguistic system in our heads?

This course introduces undergraduate students to the exciting field of second language acquisition. This course is ideal for language learners who wish to reflect on and improve their own language learning experience, for those who desire to become language instructors, and for anyone who simply has an interest in languages. The questions we will explore include:

  • Is second language acquisition like first language acquisition?
  • Does the first language help or get in the way of SLA?
  • Why do children become universally native-like but second language learners seem not to?
  • Why do we make errors in a second language (or at least appear to)?
  • I took 4 years of Spanish and got all As so why am I not fluent?
  • What’s the difference between learning two languages from birth as opposed to learning a second language later in life?
  • What about individual differences like motivation and aptitude?
  • Why do I still have an accent?
  • Is there a best way to teach languages?
  • How do I design pedagogical practice to facilitate second language acquisition?

You will have the opportunity to design and teach a brief mini online language lesson in the language of your choice.


FRIT (French and Italian) 5051 - Latin and Romance Languages

FRIT 5051

Professor Fernando Martinez-Gil, TR 12:45 pm - 2:20 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

We all know that the Romance languages are similar because they derive from Latin. But did you ever wonder how the differences among the languages developed? That is, how exactly do the words for ‘fire’ in each of the Romance languages (It. fuoco, Sp. fuego, Port. fogo, Fr. feu, Rom. Foc) relate to Latin FŎCU? Latin had a case system for nouns. Does it still exist in any of the Romance languages? If the comparative in Italian and French derives from Latin PLUS (> It. più, Fr. plus), why is the Spanish comparative different (mas)? In this course, students will develop acute analytical skills by comparing and contrasting phonological (sound) morphological (words) and syntactic (word order) changes in order to identify the linguistic processes that applied in each Romance language. In addition, we will examine the socio‐historical factors, such as the expansion of the Roman Empire and its dissolution, which contributed to the formation of the Romance languages and their divergences. Finally, students will acquire an understanding of linguistic systematicity which will enhance further studies in the language(s) of their choice, while investigation of exceptional, or unexpected developments will provide insight into the complicated nature of language change. 


Italian 5101 – Intensive Italian

Doctor Giuliano Migliori, MWF 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

GE Foreign Language

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

Text

FRIT (French and Italian) 5051 - Latin and Romance Languages

FRIT 5051

Professor Fernando Martinez-Gil, TR 12:45 pm - 2:20 pm, 3 credit hours

Taught in English.

We all know that the Romance languages are similar because they derive from Latin. But did you ever wonder how the differences among the languages developed? That is, how exactly do the words for ‘fire’ in each of the Romance languages (It. fuoco, Sp. fuego, Port. fogo, Fr. feu, Rom. Foc) relate to Latin FŎCU? Latin had a case system for nouns. Does it still exist in any of the Romance languages? If the comparative in Italian and French derives from Latin PLUS (> It. più, Fr. plus), why is the Spanish comparative different (mas)? In this course, students will develop acute analytical skills by comparing and contrasting phonological (sound) morphological (words) and syntactic (word order) changes in order to identify the linguistic processes that applied in each Romance language. In addition, we will examine the socio‐historical factors, such as the expansion of the Roman Empire and its dissolution, which contributed to the formation of the Romance languages and their divergences. Finally, students will acquire an understanding of linguistic systematicity which will enhance further studies in the language(s) of their choice, while investigation of exceptional, or unexpected developments will provide insight into the complicated nature of language change. 


Italian 5101 – Intensive Italian

Doctor Giuliano Migliori, MWF 11:10 am - 12:30 pm, 5 credit hours

GE Foreign Language

Covers the same material in Italian 1101, 1102, and 1103 in one semester course. The course is necessarily fast-paced and ideal for students who find learning foreign languages fun and interesting. Previous foreign language study ideal but not required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.


FRIT (French and Italian) 8302 – Issues in Second Language Acquisition: Input Processing, Structured Input, & Grammar Instruction: Theory, Research & Classroom Application

Professor Wynne Wong, Asynchronous ONLINE, 3 credit hours

FRIT 8302

Taught in English

Watch Course Video Intro

Course Delivery: This 3-credit course, offered by the Department of French & Italian at OSU, is taught in English, and delivered completely online in an asynchronous format. The course may be taken from anywhere at any time as long as assignments are completed by established due dates. Regular optional synchronous meetings are also available via Carmen Zoom.

Who Is This Course For?

This course is for anyone interested in second language studies/language teaching and will count toward the Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization (GIS) in Second Language Studies. Secondary education teachers are also welcome. FR 8301 is *not* a prerequisite for this course.

Course Description

Only input that has been processed can impact second language acquisition (SLA). Therefore, the study of input processing is integral to SLA research and for the development of effective pedagogical activities for classroom learning. While Corder (1967) was the first to make the distinction between input and intake, it was VanPatten’s (1996) model of input processing that provided the most elaborate account of how L2 learners derive intake from input by focusing on these critical questions: What input data do L2 learners attend to (and not attend to)? Why do they process certain data and not others? How does what they attend to (and not attend to) affect acquisition?

This course examines theoretical and instructional implications of research on input processing for the acquisition of grammar. You will be able to read research on input processing with a critical eye and understand the instructional implications of this research. You will learn how to create pedagogical interventions including structured input activities to help language learners process input better to support their acquisition of grammar.

Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • the nature of input processing (what gets and does not get processed and why);
  • current research trends in input processing;
  • the role of explicit explanation in input processing;
  • how processing instruction is different from other pedagogical interventions;
  • how to create structured input activities for the classroom;
  • how to create other input-based grammar activities to support the acquisition of grammar.

A variety of activities have been incorporated into this distance learning course to encourage student engagement and interaction, and to create an enjoyable online learning experience.

Different options for the final project are available to meet the needs and interests of different students taking the course.


FRIT (French and Italian) 8602 – Comparative French and Italian Studies: Ecocriticism and Popular Visual Culture

Professor Maggie Flinn, W 2:20 pm - 5:00 pm, 3 credit hours

In this course we will read and watch French, Francophone, and Italian contemporary films, TV series, and comics that importantly represent the natural world and lend themselves to interpretation through an eco-critical framework. Of particular interest will be topics such as: documentary vs. fictional modes, other genres (cli-fi, crime fiction), political efficacy (militancy, aestheticism, etc.), scale (temporal & geographic), eg. hyperlocalism vs. globalization, eco-feminism, agriculture and culinary discourse (terroir, labor, food chains and legacies of Empire), toxicity and trash, environmental justice, Green and Blue imaginaries, etc. Language of instruction is English and all course viewings and readings area available subtitled/in English translation. Graduate students outside of FRIT may propose research topics on primary sources outside of the geographical/linguistic foci of the seminar, as long as they engage the courses’ theoretical framework.